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About Digital Art / Professional Core Member Scott HartmanMale/United States Recent Activity
Deviant for 10 Years
1 Month Core Membership
Statistics 225 Deviations 4,393 Comments 331,612 Pageviews

Newest Deviations

Teleocrater by ScottHartman Teleocrater :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 160 43 Confuciusornis by ScottHartman Confuciusornis :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 125 39 Ixalerpeton by ScottHartman Ixalerpeton :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 134 27 Dawn 'bird' by ScottHartman Dawn 'bird' :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 128 13 Jinfengopteryx elegans - the golden phoenix by ScottHartman Jinfengopteryx elegans - the golden phoenix :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 121 21 Chinese Hunter by ScottHartman Chinese Hunter :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 134 18 The not-so-gracile Leptoceratops by ScottHartman The not-so-gracile Leptoceratops :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 132 39 Paleorhinus - not a croc! by ScottHartman Paleorhinus - not a croc! :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 152 53 A big ichthyosaur by ScottHartman A big ichthyosaur :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 152 67 Finally, an aetosaur! by ScottHartman Finally, an aetosaur! :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 168 36 Granddaddy of the armored dinosaurs by ScottHartman Granddaddy of the armored dinosaurs :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 153 40 Huayangosaurus - a primitive little stegosaur by ScottHartman Huayangosaurus - a primitive little stegosaur :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 125 21 La Rioja's ponderous biped by ScottHartman La Rioja's ponderous biped :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 111 40 Shunosaurus, a primitive club-tailed sauropod by ScottHartman Shunosaurus, a primitive club-tailed sauropod :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 133 80 Marasuchus - rabbit-croc by ScottHartman Marasuchus - rabbit-croc :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 108 27 First Horned Face by ScottHartman First Horned Face :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 146 36

Random Favourites

Plateosaurus by Apsaravis Plateosaurus :iconapsaravis:Apsaravis 415 21 Diatryma gigantea by MattMart Diatryma gigantea :iconmattmart:MattMart 194 58 Velociraptor mongoliensis by keesey Velociraptor mongoliensis :iconkeesey:keesey 133 23 PhyloPic T-shirt: Human Evolution by keesey PhyloPic T-shirt: Human Evolution :iconkeesey:keesey 47 10 Neovenator by pheaston Neovenator :iconpheaston:pheaston 211 33 Uteodon by pheaston Uteodon :iconpheaston:pheaston 133 9 Parasaurolophus cyrtocristatus by pheaston Parasaurolophus cyrtocristatus :iconpheaston:pheaston 165 15 Cottonwood lizard (Alamosaurus) by pheaston Cottonwood lizard (Alamosaurus) :iconpheaston:pheaston 274 27 DNH Little Baby Dinosaurs by r-heinart DNH Little Baby Dinosaurs :iconr-heinart:r-heinart 25 1 The Wicked Teeth of Rhamphorhynchus by Qilong The Wicked Teeth of Rhamphorhynchus :iconqilong:Qilong 106 18 Museum Triceratops by Swordlord3d Museum Triceratops :iconswordlord3d:Swordlord3d 288 18 Cardinal and Redpoll by MichelLalonde Cardinal and Redpoll :iconmichellalonde:MichelLalonde 636 61 Giraffatitan by Steveoc86 Giraffatitan :iconsteveoc86:Steveoc86 96 28 Eucoelophysis attacked by Redondasaurus by Apsaravis Eucoelophysis attacked by Redondasaurus :iconapsaravis:Apsaravis 1,091 62 Redwood by m-eralp Redwood :iconm-eralp:m-eralp 2,581 176 Acheroraptor by EWilloughby Acheroraptor :iconewilloughby:EWilloughby 642 132

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ScottHartman
Scott Hartman
Artist | Professional | Digital Art
United States
Current Residence: Wisconsin
Favourite genre of music: Anything but country!
Operating System: Windows 10, OSX, & Android
MP3 player of choice: Anything that can connect to Google Music
www.patreon.com/skeletaldrawin…
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Activity


Teleocrater
As the embargo has now been lifted, I give you the skeletal of the basal bird-line archosaur Teleocrater.

Update: I swapped in the one without armor - the one with armor is what was used in the paper, but the authors ultimately concluded that it probably lacked phytosaur-like armor.
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Confuciusornis
Possibly the most famous Mesozoic avialan after Archaeopteryx (and more safely embedded within Avialae), I finally got around to giving Confuciusornis the skeletal reconstruction treatment. This is based mostly on an unpublished specimen I got to photograph and measure in China most of a decade ago, supplemented by the Chiappe et al., monograph. The specimen I examined did not have proximally fused metacarpals - I'm not sure if that's individual variation, ontogenetic, etc., but I left it as-is.

My Patreon supporters got early access to the skeletal, including high resolution files: www.patreon.com/skeletaldrawin…
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Plunderer from Utah
Edit 2017: At long last I can share the new Utahraptor skeletal drawing. This was first shared with my Patreon supporters in a public post here: www.patreon.com/posts/8625591

I also wrote a bit more about it on my blog: www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/a…

Go check out those two posts for more detailed information, but in short it's stocky, it's powerful, and it does NOT look like an overgrown Deinonychus or Velociraptor. All of you who have been waiting for years to see this should also go visit the Utahraptor Project (and consider supporting their GoFundMe site): utahraptors.utahpaleo.org/

Enjoy!
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Front Thumbnail by ScottHartman
My colleagues and I just published a new paper (available here) that many of you might be interested in. In it we used laser-fluorescence to investigate soft-tissue data that was not apparent under visible light. It brings quite a bit of detail to what we know about Anchiornis, and for you paleoart types it should help you flesh out your small theropod reconstructions.

You can also read some of my own thoughts on it (mostly anatomy/paleoart related) on my blog here.
Ixalerpeton
I was really thrilled when this critter was published, as it wasn't really possible to nail down the proportions of any lagerpetid before this. Obviously I wish there was more information about the hands and the snout, but seriously, this was an amazing addition to our knowledge of what Triassic near-dinosaurs looked like.

Also, this truly looks like an animal that could have bounded around on all fours just about as easily as it could move bipedally (remember that when moving quadrupedally it probably would have lowered the ankle and moved with the hindlimb in a for plantigrade posture). From critters pretty much like this we get both the bipedal marasuchus-like dinosauromorphs, and apparently more quadrupedal silesaurids.

Patreon supporters had exclusive access to this for several weeks: www.patreon.com/skeletaldrawin…
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Front Thumbnail by ScottHartman
My colleagues and I just published a new paper (available here) that many of you might be interested in. In it we used laser-fluorescence to investigate soft-tissue data that was not apparent under visible light. It brings quite a bit of detail to what we know about Anchiornis, and for you paleoart types it should help you flesh out your small theropod reconstructions.

You can also read some of my own thoughts on it (mostly anatomy/paleoart related) on my blog here.

Comments


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:iconmerkavadragunov:
MerkavaDragunov Featured By Owner 6 days ago
again pardon Mr.Scott
but about telocarter (sorry if i spell anything wrong)
what do you mean by basal bird-line archosaur?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
Archosaurs split into two crown groups - crocodilians and birds. So everything that is an archosaur is either on the line to crocodilians, or the line to birds (via other dinosaurs). Teleocrater is one of the oldest species on the side that leads to dinosaurs (including birds). 
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:iconmerkavadragunov:
MerkavaDragunov Featured By Owner 6 days ago
pardon Mr.Scott
but do you have a moment
an incident has happened in the community
would mind reading this post?
link: merkavadragunov.deviantart.com…
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
I read it, but I'm not sure what you think I can do about it?
Reply
:iconmerkavadragunov:
MerkavaDragunov Featured By Owner 2 days ago
nvr mind its over before you replied
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:iconthedinorocker:
thedinorocker Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2017
Hello Mr Scott!
Can I ask about your Allosaurus skeletal?
Your A.sp bes ed in MOR 693resemble perfectly the fossil material and the model Made in 2013 (sa far sapere I can tell), but your A.fragilis labeled UUVP 6000 (=DINO 2560) is pretty different to the pictures of the fossils I saw, expecially at cranial level which appear longer and lower.
Are they different specimens or the skull is less complete Than I thor g and you recostruct it in a more conservative way based on the classical (Madsen) Allosaurus proportions ?
Best regards from Italy
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
All I can say for now is that I was working directly with the researcher working on the monograph about Allosaurus species. Sorry I can't share more than that.
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:iconthedinorocker:
thedinorocker Featured By Owner 2 days ago
Considering I made a morphometric analysis on Allosaurus skull features this is a Great news:)
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:iconflipplenup:
FlippleNup Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
What is your stance on dinosaur feathering?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Edited Apr 18, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
With a great deal of certainty all coelurosaurs had dino-fuzz primitively, all maniraptorans had elongate arm structures, and all pennaraptorans had true wing and tail feathers (secondary loss is possible, but there's no reason to invoke it without direct evidence for a specific taxa, and so far there is none).

It gets more complicated below that - some specimens of fuzzy theropods have been recovered (at times) as low as megalosaurids. Ornithischians seem to have had quite a few dermal structures, though whether they were truly homologous with theropod dermal structures is less clear (though if ornithoscelida holds up that'd support some sort of homology).

If the traditional saurischian + ornithischian tree holds up then it's possible that all dinosaur dermal structures are homologous, and even basal dinosaurs (and presumably sauropodomorphs) would have had them, at least at the base of the family tree. And if we get strong evidence for this then we have to seriously consider that all ornithodirans might have been primitively fuzzy, with pterosaur pcynofibers then being homologous with dino fuzz.

But there is a lot of research to be done before we fully assess the ideas in the second and third paragraphs. For the moment all we know for certain is the sequence of feather evolution in coelurosaurs (and maybe all tetanurans), that some ornithischians were fuzzy, and that apparently all pterosaurs were fuzzy.
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