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About Digital Art / Professional Premium Member Scott HartmanMale/United States Recent Activity
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ScottHartman
Scott Hartman
Artist | Professional | Digital Art
United States
Current Residence: Wisconsin
Favourite genre of music: Anything but country...
Operating System: Windows 8
MP3 player of choice: Anything that can connect to Google Music
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Walker's heavy claw by ScottHartman
Walker's heavy claw
Updated: After nearly a decade and a half here is the overhauled skeletal. The overall proportions aren't all that different, but some of the details are. The midline crest has been moved back above the lacrimal, and I can now confirm that the odd downcurving neck seems to be a real thing, although it also uses some upwardly deflected almost cervicalized anterior dorsals to achieve it. The gray portion of the ilium is the part that was preserved as an imprint (i.e. there is no surviving bone from those parts) and so its accuracy depends entirely on the observations of the original excavators.

I hope to have more on my blog this weekend. 

Previous description: Baryonyx wasn't the first spinosaurid found, but it went a long ways in clarifying what these sorts of theropods looked like and ate. And it turns out they ate fish - although like modern crocodilians, Baryonyx almost certainly ate anything else it could get a hold of too (both fish scales and iguanodont bones were found in its stomach).
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I'm sorry, I don't have a new Spinosaurus skeletal for you based on the new material. It will probably be a while yet until I do. But I was surprised enough by the proportions to want to check them, and the published lengths of the new neotype specimen don't actually match the reconstruction that was published in the paper. Above is my corrected version - to find out more about how I got there you can hop on over to my blog...and I'll apologize in advance for the wall of text that awaits you.
The dragon with the multicolored crown by ScottHartman
The dragon with the multicolored crown
Actually, the "multi-colored" part of Guanlong's name ('wucaii') refers to the rock, but it's a lot more evocative if you read the name literally, so for the title I did. Anyhow, here is the long-awaited skeletal of the adult specimen of Guanlong, a proceratosaurid tyrannosauroid (don't try saying that five times fast!). 

You can also read more about the process (and challenges) of restoring this skeletal on my blog: www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/g…
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Don't mess with T. rexes by ScottHartman
Don't mess with T. rexes
Ok, so I took some liberties with the spelling (for the non-Americans out there, I was poking fun at the phrase "Don't mess with Texas"). Technically this is a work in progress as I still need to update Peck's Rex and then do MOR 555, but I'm not actually researching Cretaceous dinosaurs right now and there's only so many hours in the day.

Enjoy!
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For those of you artists who don't follow every last Facebook update on dinosaurs, I thought I's pass along this link. It describes Kulindadromeus, a Jurassic ornithischian from Siberia that is covered in a combination of scales AND fuzz. While it will probably take a while to develop a proper scientific consensus as to whether these are truly feather-like structures, elaborate scales, or some other epidermal structure, the take home message for you is that dinofuzz can now be inferred to be possible in essentially all dinosaurs. And furthermore Kulindadromeus has a scaly, dare I say almost rat-like tail to go along with its fuzz. So apparently the idea that dinosaurs couldn't contain both scales and fuzz is also incorrect (whether this applies to true feathers is not yet known).

Enjoy!


I'm sorry, I don't have a new Spinosaurus skeletal for you based on the new material. It will probably be a while yet until I do. But I was surprised enough by the proportions to want to check them, and the published lengths of the new neotype specimen don't actually match the reconstruction that was published in the paper. Above is my corrected version - to find out more about how I got there you can hop on over to my blog...and I'll apologize in advance for the wall of text that awaits you.

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:iconthescipio:
TheScipio Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Hello Scott, I was wondering something about your skull reconstructions. I always see your skeletals (and everyone else's) having the mouth open. In real life I know that animals don't constantly have their mouths gaped open like they're about to yell and scream for no reason, so I was wondering if you could have a closed mouth version of your dinosaurs. I understand why you keep it open so people can see what the inside would look like though. I don't know why but I get confused on how to reconstruct the closed mouths of some dinosaurs, usually ones with strange mouth proportions. These animals usually include things like long toothed ceratosaurs, spinosaurs and the strangely proportioned diplodocines. I ask this since I don't think it would be that much of a problem on your end (I think) since you know the biomechanics of the jaws movements much more so then I do, plus you could just do it rather quickly (I presume) since all you have to do is move the jaw with your tools you already use in making your reconstructions.

Thank you and keep up the good work :)

Ps, I would LOVE if you reconstructed the skeletons of Brontosaurus yahnahpin and B.parvus. Maybe also Kaatedocus and Galeamopus.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
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:iconthescipio:
TheScipio Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Oh, and I forgot to mention, do you think you could maybe do a frontal view of some of them? A lot of people don't realize (including me sometimes) how skiny or chubby some of them truely are.
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:iconthescipio:
TheScipio Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you... it's so beautiful Love La la la la 
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:iconjonagold2000:
JonaGold2000 Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Can you five me some opinions on this jonagold2000.deviantart.com/ar…
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:icondinopithecus:
Dinopithecus Featured By Owner Edited Apr 16, 2015
How are doing Mr. Hartman? I hope well. I have to ask your opinion on a certain subject once more.

Abler (1992) found that the serrations on the teeth of Tyrannosaurus do not fulfill a cutting function as in animals like Carcharodon or Troodon (and I'd finish the puzzle by saying by extension many other theropods), but he likewise proposed that the serrations held rotting pieces of meat for bacteria that would have aided Tyrannosaurus in predation.

No one really buys the infectious bite theory anymore though, so why do you believe tyrannosaurids retained the serrated carinae on their teeth? What do you think they used them for?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I can't recall the paper off hand, but I believe it was shown that the serrations helped prevent bunching up and binding of tissue during biting/twisting. Maybe someone else can chime in with the citation, as I have grading to catch up on :( 
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:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2015
Dear Mr. Hartman,

In the same paper that described Galeamopus hayi, lumped Dinheirosaurus as a species of Supersaurus, and "resurrected" Brontosaurus (peerj.com/articles/857/), the researchers concluded that the type specimen of Diplodocus longus is not diagnostic enough, meaning that D. longus is now a nomen dubium (with a petition being considered that will make D. carnegeii the new type species). As well as that, the more complete specimens referred to D. longus are now assigned to Diplodocus hallorum.

What are your thoughts?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Offhand I don't agree that D. longus isn't diagnostic, but I'm not that attached to it either. But since I think D. "hallorum" is D. longus, then if we are going to dump longus I certainly think those specimens should be referred to D. hallorum.
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