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About Digital Art / Professional Official Beta Tester Scott HartmanMale/United States Recent Activity
Deviant for 9 Years
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ScottHartman
Scott Hartman
Artist | Professional | Digital Art
United States
Current Residence: Wisconsin
Favourite genre of music: Anything but country!
Operating System: Windows 10, OSX, & Android
MP3 player of choice: Anything that can connect to Google Music
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Walker's heavy claw (2016) by ScottHartman
Walker's heavy claw (2016)
2016 Update: I updated the presacral series to reflect the new identifications of Evers et al. 2015 in their Sigilmassasaurus description. This has the effect of putting a stronger S-curve back into the neck, but it still leaves us with a hangdog angle for the skull. Interestingly, the neural spine morphology suggests the building up of axial muscles or nuchal ligaments (or both) along the back of the neck and front of the dorsal column, which is not unlike what Andre Cau has suggested for Spinosaurus, and would make it analogous to what we see in Deinocheirus as well (but on a smaller scale than either of those taxa).

I'm not seeing the extreme upturn in the neck that Cau has hypothesized for Spinosaurus, but there is decent flexibility in the base of the neck, and of course Spinosaurus is more specialized in other areas and might be in the base of the neck as well - though I'd tend towards being more conservative right now since we don't lack for extreme speculation regarding Spinosaurus these days.


2015 Updated: After nearly a decade and a half here is the overhauled skeletal. The overall proportions aren't all that different, but some of the details are. The midline crest has been moved back above the lacrimal, and I can now confirm that the odd downcurving neck seems to be a real thing, although it also uses some upwardly deflected almost cervicalized anterior dorsals to achieve it. The gray portion of the ilium is the part that was preserved as an imprint (i.e. there is no surviving bone from those parts) and so its accuracy depends entirely on the observations of the original excavators.

Original description: Baryonyx wasn't the first spinosaurid found, but it went a long ways in clarifying what these sorts of theropods looked like and ate. And it turns out they ate fish - although like modern crocodilians, Baryonyx almost certainly ate anything else it could get a hold of too (both fish scales and iguanodont bones were found in its stomach).
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The not-so-gracile Leptoceratops by ScottHartman
The not-so-gracile Leptoceratops
This stocky little ceratopsian was given the name Leptoceratops gracilis, but additional finds have rendered the trvial epithet ironic, at best. 
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Paleorhinus - not a croc! by ScottHartman
Paleorhinus - not a croc!
Here's the phytosaur Paleorhinus bransoni. It's clearly one of the long, slender snouted phytosaurs that probably ate more fish or small vertebrates than it did dicynodonts or early dinosaurs. If you are wondering what a phytosaur is, or why it's not a crocodilian, it's because archosaurmorphs produced a croc-like body plan (the phytosaurs) that were widespread in the Triassic before crocs could occupy that role.

In fact Triassic crocodilians were small, fast-running terrestrial animals with upright limbs - they didn't adopt the sprawling, semi-aquatic form we are familiar with now until later. So in a way phytosaurs were crocs before crocs were crocs!
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Finally, an aetosaur! by ScottHartman
Finally, an aetosaur!
Stagonolepis, the eponymous stagonolepid aetosaur. These odd, beaked, croc-line archosaurs were sort of like armored pig-crocs, apparently using their upturned snouts to root around for roots and other vegetative matter, and possibly insects and grubs (though the latter is more controversial). They were very successful for a brief time in the latter parts of the Triassic, and then were gone, along with the loss of most other crurotarsans.

I avoided doing an aetosaur for a long time (and pushed this commission back to the last possible moment). Not only is the armor obviously a huge pain, but the vertebral column was poorly documented and I was concerned that it would prevent me from restoring even the basic shape of the animal. After talking about this with some other researchers and amassing a ton of papers and photos, it turns out that Walker's venerable 1961 monograph on Stagonolepis actually had some of the key data in it that I needed. So here you go.
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Tylosaurus - teach the controversey web resolution by ScottHartman 

First of all, let me thank all of you who wrote birthday well-wishes, all of the wonderful social interactions on DA are what keep me coming back. I also wanted to update you on a blog post I wrote about mosasaur tails: www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/m…

The tl;dr version is that you can still find people who would support any these extremes in tail fluke design, but I think the middle two (or somewhere in between) is the most likely. Hit up the article for more depth as to why.

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:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner 2 days ago  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Could you post some of the skeletals from your website here if you have time?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
Quite a few of them are here. But I don't have the time to duplicate my efforts exactly - ultimately if you want to guarantee that you have the best versions you should check my website - I maintain a presence on DA for the community discussion, not as a 100% duplication of my other web content.
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:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner 4 days ago  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Are there any more documents on this specimen?
www.researchgate.net/publicati…
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
I think it's pretty well accepted that it's Edmontosaurus, and that they do indeed have segmented frills. Brachylophosaurus also has one, though the individual frill segments have a unique scalloped shape to them that makes it look a bit more like a picket fence.
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:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner 4 days ago  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
What do you think about size?
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:iconxstreamchaosofficial:
XStreamChaosOfficial Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hi Scott Hartman! I love to see myself as an amatuer paleoartist at the age of 15. Already at this age I'm being encouraged to look for colleges. Do you know any colleges that probably have a mix of paleoart, and/or animal art, and/or paleontology? How'd you learn how to do such accurate illustrations? Did you go to a college for that or something? I hope to one day be an illustrator for museums, media, documentaries, and my own personal projects. :)
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
I'm glad you are so enthused about this process. Unfortunately I don't personally know of any paleoart courses, though there are some degrees in medical and/or scientific illustration that would help you learn the requisite skills. In my experience most paleoartists are either people who get fine art degrees and then spend a lot of time learning anatomy themselves, or they get science degrees and then learn art on their own (or take outside courses). 

Personally I followed the second route - my undergraduate degree is in zoology, and I took as many anatomy courses as possible (and did lots of dissections). The art part I learned in a much more trial and error fashion, and all of my techniques have evolved quite a bit the last two decades. One thing I was lucky enough to do was surround myself with very talented artists as friends, and their feedback was invaluable.

One thing you might check out is the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. They have a publication that has useful articles, and I think they would also be a good resource to find courses on the subject etc.

I hope that helps!

-Scott
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:iconxstreamchaosofficial:
XStreamChaosOfficial Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wow! Thanks a lot! :)
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:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner Edited 6 days ago  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
comments.deviantart.com/1/1536…
How am I supposed to explain that how these statements are wrong?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
Which of the many wrong statements on that link are you even talking about?
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