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About Digital Art / Professional Core Member Scott HartmanMale/United States Recent Activity
Deviant for 10 Years
2 Month Core Membership
Statistics 223 Deviations 4,274 Comments 326,106 Pageviews

Newest Deviations

Ixalerpeton :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 127 27 Dawn 'bird' :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 124 13 Jinfengopteryx elegans - the golden phoenix :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 118 20 Chinese Hunter :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 132 18 The not-so-gracile Leptoceratops :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 129 39 Paleorhinus - not a croc! :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 150 53 A big ichthyosaur :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 151 67 Finally, an aetosaur! :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 164 36 Granddaddy of the armored dinosaurs :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 147 40 Huayangosaurus - a primitive little stegosaur :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 124 21 La Rioja's ponderous biped :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 107 40 Shunosaurus, a primitive club-tailed sauropod :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 132 80 Marasuchus - rabbit-croc :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 107 27 First Horned Face :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 145 36 Iguanodon :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 173 122 Coelophysis bauri :iconscotthartman:ScottHartman 135 53

Random Favourites

Stegosaurus stenops :icont-pekc:T-PEKC 153 22 Horns03: Medusaceratops :icontuomaskoivurinne:tuomaskoivurinne 176 23 Morrison Gloaming :iconashere:Ashere 123 13 Tirrhopi :iconsagekorppi:SageKorppi 288 52 Skrrpt :iconsagekorppi:SageKorppi 190 17 Terrestrisuchus Muscle Study :iconqilong:Qilong 33 4 Anchiornis - new version :iconewilloughby:EWilloughby 267 62 Archie and Compie :icondustdevil:dustdevil 392 44 Pot-bellied Pteranodon :iconjconway:jconway 93 19 Cryolophosaurus elliotti :iconbrokenmachine86:BrokenMachine86 85 44 Campylognathoides :iconeurwentala:Eurwentala 260 46 Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis :iconfelipe-elias:felipe-elias 207 55 Monolophosaurus jiangi :iconbrokenmachine86:BrokenMachine86 88 32 Solnhofen :icondustdevil:dustdevil 190 20 Dead Velociraptor mongoliensis :iconjconway:jconway 339 43 Hypuronector limnaios :icondustdevil:dustdevil 138 13

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ScottHartman
Scott Hartman
Artist | Professional | Digital Art
United States
Current Residence: Wisconsin
Favourite genre of music: Anything but country!
Operating System: Windows 10, OSX, & Android
MP3 player of choice: Anything that can connect to Google Music
www.patreon.com/skeletaldrawin…
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Activity


Front Thumbnail by ScottHartman
My colleagues and I just published a new paper (available here) that many of you might be interested in. In it we used laser-fluorescence to investigate soft-tissue data that was not apparent under visible light. It brings quite a bit of detail to what we know about Anchiornis, and for you paleoart types it should help you flesh out your small theropod reconstructions.

You can also read some of my own thoughts on it (mostly anatomy/paleoart related) on my blog here.
Ixalerpeton
I was really thrilled when this critter was published, as it wasn't really possible to nail down the proportions of any lagerpetid before this. Obviously I wish there was more information about the hands and the snout, but seriously, this was an amazing addition to our knowledge of what Triassic near-dinosaurs looked like.

Also, this truly looks like an animal that could have bounded around on all fours just about as easily as it could move bipedally (remember that when moving quadrupedally it probably would have lowered the ankle and moved with the hindlimb in a for plantigrade posture). From critters pretty much like this we get both the bipedal marasuchus-like dinosauromorphs, and apparently more quadrupedal silesaurids.

Patreon supporters had exclusive access to this for several weeks: www.patreon.com/skeletaldrawin…
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Dawn 'bird'
Aurornis, the "dawn bird" is another taxa from the basal avialan/basal troodontid bush, and again I have no formal opinion on its phylogeny that I'm willing to make public right now. The skull and proportions feel less elegant to me than say Jinfengopteryx, but I suppose once you cover it in a proper coat of feathers it'd look just fine.
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Jinfengopteryx elegans - the golden phoenix
Completely overhauled version of a much older skeletal. Basal troodontid/avialan thing, more details when Lori is published.

Patreon supporters had exclusive early access www.patreon.com/skeletaldrawin…
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Dimetrodon skeletal 4 web by ScottHartman
I often have to sit on top of new skeletal reconstructions for a long time before I can show them (Utahraptor would be the most infamous example to my DA followers), but this one has been hard to clam up about since I did it more than a year ago: Dimetrodon grandis.

The skeletal was done during the design process for the excellent Permian line of clothes and merchandise  and they understandably wanted to wait on showing it off until their product line launched.

But now it has! So here is my overhaul of D. grandis, based as much as possible on the Smithsonian specimen, with the tail taken from other specimens. The high-walk-in-a-hurry pose is something I created specifically for Permia; I will be creating a more sedate high-walk pose for the version that eventually ends up in my galleries, but I didn't want to wait any longer to share it.

If you want to read more about how the skeletal was made (and the data used) you can read about it on my website here.

Enjoy!
Front Thumbnail by ScottHartman
My colleagues and I just published a new paper (available here) that many of you might be interested in. In it we used laser-fluorescence to investigate soft-tissue data that was not apparent under visible light. It brings quite a bit of detail to what we know about Anchiornis, and for you paleoart types it should help you flesh out your small theropod reconstructions.

You can also read some of my own thoughts on it (mostly anatomy/paleoart related) on my blog here.

Comments


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:icondinopithecus:
Dinopithecus Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2017
I think I remember reading how the M. caudofemoralis is/was the primary hindlimb retractor in the tails of many sauropsids, implying it's not the only one. Do you know of any other tail muscles that fulfilled this role?
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:icondovahkiinhu3br:
DovahkiinHU3BR Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2017
Mister Hartman, I recently read about the recently discovered theropod that had bird like muscles on it's arms. Then I wondered: did dromaeosaurids have arm muscles fit to lift feathers?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
It seems like a reasonable inference since they had full complements of wing feathers, but those sorts of muscles don't leave scars on the bones, so it's not something easy to test.
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:icondovahkiinhu3br:
DovahkiinHU3BR Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2017
Strange. Scientists were able to see that a certain winged dinosaur had such muscles thanks to scars on the bones. Maybe the muscles of a small bird do not leave scars like the muscles of a duck (having in mind how ducks fly). Now I am curious...
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 9, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Some muscles only interact with connective fascia rather than insert on bone.
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(1 Reply)
:icondinopithecus:
Dinopithecus Featured By Owner Edited Mar 3, 2017
I read a couple times that tyrannosaurid scapulae and coracoids could have anchored neck muscles instead of forelimb muscles (which may make sense on account of how tyrannosaurid forelimbs are), thus augmenting the power of the neck. Is there any actual indication of this, though?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
All pectoral girdles, in all tetrapod taxa that have them, anchor neck muscles. It's not a matter of making tyrannosaur necks stronger than other theropod necks (though this may be so for other reasons) but rather a matter for understanding why the scap/coracoids persisted as the distal forelimb elements were reduced.
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:icondinopithecus:
Dinopithecus Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017
So are you saying that for whatever reasons tyrannosaurids may have had stronger necks than other theropods, having neck muscle attachments to the pectoral girdles wasn't one of them?

I was sort of under the impression that tyrannosaurids, with less raptorial use for their forelimbs, may have compensated by having neck muscle attachments take up even more room on their pectoral girdles and shoulders than in more "normal" theropods. Of course, just because this makes sense doesn't mean they actually did, but, yeah...
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
The evidence that tyrannosaurines had stronger necks comes largely from vertebral morphology, and the muscle insertions on the back of the skull. The pectoral girdle certainly does support some of those muscles, but the scap/coracoid of tyrannosaurines isn't obviously larger or more massive than other theropods.

What probably is true is the corollary: that because the pectoral girdle was still used in neck and torso muscles it doesn't atrophy the way you might expect it to when the arms became less useful (the same is true of abelisaurs, and probably for the same reason).
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2017
Have you seen the YouTube show "Your Dinosaurs Are Wrong"? I discovered it yesterday, and binge watched the whole series.
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