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About Digital Art / Professional Premium Member Scott HartmanMale/United States Recent Activity
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Walker's heavy claw by ScottHartman
Walker's heavy claw
Updated: After nearly a decade and a half here is the overhauled skeletal. The overall proportions aren't all that different, but some of the details are. The midline crest has been moved back above the lacrimal, and I can now confirm that the odd downcurving neck seems to be a real thing, although it also uses some upwardly deflected almost cervicalized anterior dorsals to achieve it. The gray portion of the ilium is the part that was preserved as an imprint (i.e. there is no surviving bone from those parts) and so its accuracy depends entirely on the observations of the original excavators.

I hope to have more on my blog this weekend. 

Previous description: Baryonyx wasn't the first spinosaurid found, but it went a long ways in clarifying what these sorts of theropods looked like and ate. And it turns out they ate fish - although like modern crocodilians, Baryonyx almost certainly ate anything else it could get a hold of too (both fish scales and iguanodont bones were found in its stomach).
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I'm sorry, I don't have a new Spinosaurus skeletal for you based on the new material. It will probably be a while yet until I do. But I was surprised enough by the proportions to want to check them, and the published lengths of the new neotype specimen don't actually match the reconstruction that was published in the paper. Above is my corrected version - to find out more about how I got there you can hop on over to my blog...and I'll apologize in advance for the wall of text that awaits you.
The dragon with the multicolored crown by ScottHartman
The dragon with the multicolored crown
Actually, the "multi-colored" part of Guanlong's name ('wucaii') refers to the rock, but it's a lot more evocative if you read the name literally, so for the title I did. Anyhow, here is the long-awaited skeletal of the adult specimen of Guanlong, a proceratosaurid tyrannosauroid (don't try saying that five times fast!). 

You can also read more about the process (and challenges) of restoring this skeletal on my blog: www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/g…
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Don't mess with T. rexes by ScottHartman
Don't mess with T. rexes
Ok, so I took some liberties with the spelling (for the non-Americans out there, I was poking fun at the phrase "Don't mess with Texas"). Technically this is a work in progress as I still need to update Peck's Rex and then do MOR 555, but I'm not actually researching Cretaceous dinosaurs right now and there's only so many hours in the day.

Enjoy!
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For those of you artists who don't follow every last Facebook update on dinosaurs, I thought I's pass along this link. It describes Kulindadromeus, a Jurassic ornithischian from Siberia that is covered in a combination of scales AND fuzz. While it will probably take a while to develop a proper scientific consensus as to whether these are truly feather-like structures, elaborate scales, or some other epidermal structure, the take home message for you is that dinofuzz can now be inferred to be possible in essentially all dinosaurs. And furthermore Kulindadromeus has a scaly, dare I say almost rat-like tail to go along with its fuzz. So apparently the idea that dinosaurs couldn't contain both scales and fuzz is also incorrect (whether this applies to true feathers is not yet known).

Enjoy!


I'm sorry, I don't have a new Spinosaurus skeletal for you based on the new material. It will probably be a while yet until I do. But I was surprised enough by the proportions to want to check them, and the published lengths of the new neotype specimen don't actually match the reconstruction that was published in the paper. Above is my corrected version - to find out more about how I got there you can hop on over to my blog...and I'll apologize in advance for the wall of text that awaits you.

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ScottHartman
Scott Hartman
Artist | Professional | Digital Art
United States
Current Residence: Wisconsin
Favourite genre of music: Anything but country...
Operating System: Windows 8
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:iconthedinorocker:
thedinorocker Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2015
Hello Mr Scott, sorry if I bother you.
Recently I see the new Stegosaurus Mount on London and I have a few questions.
The "sophie" specimen was originale nicknamed "Sarah" and it was classified as Stegosaurus armatus for the high number of plates (18 found but probably at least 19 in life) and shape and some cranial features, but Now That appear a S.stenops specimen.
I Know the S.armatus holotype is far to be complete but could the Sarah/Sophie specimen really do not be a S.stenops?
or Now we should accept Stegosaurus stenops had more than 17 plates?
thank you :)
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
It's a good question; I would note that the specimen hasn't been published yet, so technically it's never been classified at all. I'd wait for that before worrying about the implications.
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:iconthedinorocker:
thedinorocker Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2015
Yes hope to see a paper about soon :)
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:iconredtallin:
RedTallin Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2015  Student General Artist
Hello!

Firstly I have to say how much your reconstructions have inspired me in my own art and how helpful they are to an inspiring palaeoartist!

I was wondering if you have made any skeletals of saurpods that are close kin to Shunosaurus? I'm planning to make a 3d model of this dinosaur but I want to make sure it's as anatomically accurate as possible...
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Hi Red,

Thanks for the nice comments. Unfortunately I have not done a skeletal of either Shunosaurus or its closest relatives. It's high on my list of skeletals I want to do (I really want to do the entire "prosauropod" to sauropod transition) but it looks like I have a new batch of commissioned work that will keep my busy through June at least.
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:iconredtallin:
RedTallin Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2015  Student General Artist
Thank you very much for the swift reply! I also find the transition to the giant sauropods fascinating. Good luck with your work and I look forward to seeing more art from you in the future!
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:iconshapeintheclouds:
shapeintheclouds Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2015  New member Professional Artist
Scott: I have been commissioned to sculpt a Utahraptor that is due for delivery in April. I have seen the news of the group of Utahraptors that have been removed for study, and now your caution that the description is changing. Is it smart to hold off on using current depictions to base my work? It looks to me like I might have a good reason to recommend a different animal. Would you agree?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I don't know for sure that the description will change even further with the new specimens, but it seems entirely possible. If your customer can be satisfied with a better known taxa that's the safest best, otherwise try to match the generally robust silhouette I placed on Phylopic: phylopic.org/image/67e75a1f-00…
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:iconshapeintheclouds:
shapeintheclouds Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2015  New member Professional Artist
Thanks! They liked the Deinonychus and I might go back and suggest it. I plan to see the Ostrom specimen at Yale soon.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
The specimen or the mount? 
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