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About Digital Art / Professional Official Beta Tester Scott HartmanMale/United States Recent Activity
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ScottHartman
Scott Hartman
Artist | Professional | Digital Art
United States
Current Residence: Wisconsin
Favourite genre of music: Anything but country!
Operating System: Windows 10, OSX, & Android
MP3 player of choice: Anything that can connect to Google Music
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Experiment by ScottHartman

Update: Funded! Thanks for everyone who helped with support or spreading the news!

Hello Fellow DAers!

As some of you know, for more than a decade I have been involved with describing a new troodontid from the Morrison Formation. The specimen was nicknamed "Lori", and I and my colleagues have presented preliminary work at SVP in years past. At long last we are just about ready to submit the paper for publication, but need a last round of transporting the specimen for Micro CT scans, imaging the specimen for publication, and getting the authors together in one place to hash out the final paper.

To that end we started an Experiment.com  fundraising page. The funds will cover the aforementioned transportation costs, as well as page costs to make the paper Open Access, and share some of the costs associated with CA-TIMS dating and other tests we are running.

We are quite close to our goal, but we are also close to the deadline, so if any of you are able to support the research we would greatly appreciate it. And if you don't have the resources to donate (I understand!) please share the project online.

Thank you!

-Scott

P.S. Josh Cotton did this great life reconstruction of Lori playing dodge-the-sauropod-foot, which is totally worth enjoying:

Lori by ScottHartman
Call me...Sea Lord! by ScottHartman
Call me...Sea Lord!
It's not Chris Pratt, it's Thalassomedon! It's mostly in a swimming pose, but it wouldn't normally swim with its mouth open (unless maybe it had bad breath).

Edit: After analyzing the hydrodynamic implications I've updated the shape of the fluke.
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Walker's heavy claw (2016) by ScottHartman
Walker's heavy claw (2016)
2016 Update: I updated the presacral series to reflect the new identifications of Evers et al. 2015 in their Sigilmassasaurus description. This has the effect of putting a stronger S-curve back into the neck, but it still leaves us with a hangdog angle for the skull. Interestingly, the neural spine morphology suggests the building up of axial muscles or nuchal ligaments (or both) along the back of the neck and front of the dorsal column, which is not unlike what Andre Cau has suggested for Spinosaurus, and would make it analogous to what we see in Deinocheirus as well (but on a smaller scale than either of those taxa).

I'm not seeing the extreme upturn in the neck that Cau has hypothesized for Spinosaurus, but there is decent flexibility in the base of the neck, and of course Spinosaurus is more specialized in other areas and might be in the base of the neck as well - though I'd tend towards being more conservative right now since we don't lack for extreme speculation regarding Spinosaurus these days.


2015 Updated: After nearly a decade and a half here is the overhauled skeletal. The overall proportions aren't all that different, but some of the details are. The midline crest has been moved back above the lacrimal, and I can now confirm that the odd downcurving neck seems to be a real thing, although it also uses some upwardly deflected almost cervicalized anterior dorsals to achieve it. The gray portion of the ilium is the part that was preserved as an imprint (i.e. there is no surviving bone from those parts) and so its accuracy depends entirely on the observations of the original excavators.

Original description: Baryonyx wasn't the first spinosaurid found, but it went a long ways in clarifying what these sorts of theropods looked like and ate. And it turns out they ate fish - although like modern crocodilians, Baryonyx almost certainly ate anything else it could get a hold of too (both fish scales and iguanodont bones were found in its stomach).
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The not-so-gracile Leptoceratops by ScottHartman
The not-so-gracile Leptoceratops
This stocky little ceratopsian was given the name Leptoceratops gracilis, but additional finds have rendered the trvial epithet ironic, at best. 
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Paleorhinus - not a croc! by ScottHartman
Paleorhinus - not a croc!
Here's the phytosaur Paleorhinus bransoni. It's clearly one of the long, slender snouted phytosaurs that probably ate more fish or small vertebrates than it did dicynodonts or early dinosaurs. If you are wondering what a phytosaur is, or why it's not a crocodilian, it's because archosaurmorphs produced a croc-like body plan (the phytosaurs) that were widespread in the Triassic before crocs could occupy that role.

In fact Triassic crocodilians were small, fast-running terrestrial animals with upright limbs - they didn't adopt the sprawling, semi-aquatic form we are familiar with now until later. So in a way phytosaurs were crocs before crocs were crocs!
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Experiment by ScottHartman

Update: Funded! Thanks for everyone who helped with support or spreading the news!

Hello Fellow DAers!

As some of you know, for more than a decade I have been involved with describing a new troodontid from the Morrison Formation. The specimen was nicknamed "Lori", and I and my colleagues have presented preliminary work at SVP in years past. At long last we are just about ready to submit the paper for publication, but need a last round of transporting the specimen for Micro CT scans, imaging the specimen for publication, and getting the authors together in one place to hash out the final paper.

To that end we started an Experiment.com  fundraising page. The funds will cover the aforementioned transportation costs, as well as page costs to make the paper Open Access, and share some of the costs associated with CA-TIMS dating and other tests we are running.

We are quite close to our goal, but we are also close to the deadline, so if any of you are able to support the research we would greatly appreciate it. And if you don't have the resources to donate (I understand!) please share the project online.

Thank you!

-Scott

P.S. Josh Cotton did this great life reconstruction of Lori playing dodge-the-sauropod-foot, which is totally worth enjoying:

Lori by ScottHartman

Comments


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:iconkingspacegodzilla94:
kingspacegodzilla94 Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2016  Student Artisan Crafter
Excuse me sir I want to become a Paleoartist , but I will like to know how to become a Former Paleoartist , and is there any carers or studies that I need to take to become one Meow :3 
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
I'm not sure what you mean by "former" paleoartist, but there really aren't formal paleoart courses. There are some scientific illustration programs that would help you to learn the necessary art skills, and you should take as many anatomy classes (and/or read anatomy books, etc.) to build up the knowledge you need for paleoart.
Reply
:iconkingspacegodzilla94:
kingspacegodzilla94 Featured By Owner 5 days ago  Student Artisan Crafter
Ok , thanks a lot is just I was studying art in my college , concentrating in sculpture so any way I have to take anatomy classes , and other artistic techniques as part of the university requirements for graduating , and I meant former as in is there was an actual career for it , but really thanks for everything sir :D (Big Grin) 
Reply
:icondovahkiinhu3br:
DovahkiinHU3BR Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2016
What do you think about this books.google.com.br/books?hl=e…?
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
I think most of those characters are either variable within adults of each species, or are known to vary during ontogeny within tyrannosaurs.
Reply
:icondovahkiinhu3br:
DovahkiinHU3BR Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2016
The problem is that in many of these aspects Jane and the Cleveland skull are EQUAL to adult gorgosaurus. Teenagers should show eighter very similar bones if compared to adults or at least an intermediate (I think that is the word) shape.
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
That's not actually a problem at all - it's what you might expect depending on the heterochronic method of evolving the "more adult" phenotype in T. rex. 
Reply
(1 Reply)
:icondovahkiinhu3br:
DovahkiinHU3BR Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2016
Do different adult T. rex specimens show diffrerent numbers of teeth?
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
That's correct.
Reply
:iconscyther500:
scyther500 Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Say, I know this is a rather old comment now, but would you happen to know any examples? Just curious.

Thanks.
Reply
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