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Submitted on
March 5, 2011
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African Fisher by ScottHartman African Fisher by ScottHartman
Suchomimus, the semi-fin-backed relative of Baryonyx and (to a lesser degree) Spinosaurus.
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:iconmegalosaurid:
Exactly how big is the skull?? and, how long is the stretched animal? and how long is the animal in axial length? 
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:iconharlequinzeg0:
HarlequinzEg0 May 1, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hey, I recently attempted to model a Sucho in zbrush using this as a reference, that i have uploaded to my profile recently! It is quite useful to have such a great artist such as yourself offering these resources for others to use man. many thanks :D
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Jan 24, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
cool!
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:iconblade-of-the-moon:
Blade-of-the-Moon Jan 19, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
What was updated on this one ? I recently printed out your old one to base a piece one eventually.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Jan 20, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
As Blaze and Steve have noted, the pose is now consistent with my new biped pose, there were some adjustments to the rib cage and the pectoral girdle, and there were also some updates to the silhouette to reflect some changes in soft-tissue anatomy.
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:iconblade-of-the-moon:
Blade-of-the-Moon Jan 20, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Ah okay, thank you all then. I shall need a new copy then before basing a sculpt off of it.. lol Fortunately I haven't done much yet but figure up the size.

If you ever get around to it I would love multiple angles for many if not all of the skeletals. It's amazing how thin so many theropod dinos are.

I'm currently working off your Allosaurus pieces to do a 1:1 sculpture. It is a little difficult going from one skeletal to someone else's from a different perspective. ;)
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Jan 20, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
I would love to do more multi-view skeletals, but those take even longer than side views, so unless someone specifically commissions them they rarely get done I'm afraid :(
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:iconblade-of-the-moon:
Blade-of-the-Moon Jan 21, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
I understand that too well.

I did have an idea I think is original. One could make a three dimensional skeleton on a turn table. It can be viewed from any angle then . Add the options to view it with musculature and flesh added. It could be paused and printed out from any spot. Might be the ultimate resource for reconstructing dinosaurs if done right.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Jan 22, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Honestly, I've considered doing something like this, but it needs to be done right, and I'm concerned that instead someone will rip one out that is wrong and do more harm than good. I've worked with several scanned datasets, and I think any attempts absolutely must be done this way - having created about two dozen dinosaur mounts I have to say that people who have only drawn them in 2D probably don't understanding how dinosaurs go together in three dimensions, and trying to sculpt them in 3d without being constrained by the actual fossils will almost certainly be in error. I've done a little bit of work in Zbrush as well as Autodesk Softimage (including making some 3D build ups of scanned data) but it would take a couple of weeks and a commission to actually get one done and ready for public consumption, which sadly isn't time I have right now.
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:iconblade-of-the-moon:
Blade-of-the-Moon Jan 27, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
I'm pretty computer illiterate..especially when it comes to using art programs. I mostly prefer sculpting or pen/pencil.

Your quite right..I can easily see how it could go awry. Without an actual mount to study it is really difficult wrapping your head around some dinosaurian shapes and placements. Hence using as many skeletal references as possible and even then things go off track when missing an angle you need. Replicas and figures help a little but what if the artist who made them had the same issue ? Quite frustrating.

If you ever get the chance to work on it, I would guarantee it would a big hit with other artists who just can't find what they need to proceed. There is a lot up in the air still concerning dinosaurs..but there is enough known to get the basics right I think..one just needs access to the materials.
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