Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
Carnotaurus is a mouth with legs by ScottHartman Carnotaurus is a mouth with legs by ScottHartman
Seriously - I feel like it's a caricature of a real theropod.

Of course all abelisaurs are weird. The lower legs and much of the tail are restored after Aucasaurus, but otherwise it's a remarkably complete specimen.

For those who don't know, this guy was also found with extensive skin impressions. Scales on this one! That included irregular rows of large non-bony scute-like scales down the top and sides of the animal.
Add a Comment:
 

The Artist has requested Critique on this Artwork

Please sign up or login to post a critique.

:icondovahkiinhu3br:
DovahkiinHU3BR Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2016
And after this there are people saying that T. rex had useless arms...
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Lol, well, they can both have useless arms.
Reply
:icondovahkiinhu3br:
DovahkiinHU3BR Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2016
But carniotarus' arms would surely be far more useless XD
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Possibly - maybe tyrannosaurs sported feathery displays during mating season? 
Reply
:icondovahkiinhu3br:
DovahkiinHU3BR Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2016
Possibly.
Reply
:iconthedubstepaddict:
TheDubstepAddict Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
A sussage with a piranha head
Reply
:icontrilobitecannibal:
TrilobiteCannibal Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  New Deviant  Traditional Artist
or a piranha with a sausage body :p
Reply
:iconthedubstepaddict:
TheDubstepAddict Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
No, a Piranha-faced giant chicken with landflippers, a saussage body and bull horns ^^
Reply
:icontrilobitecannibal:
TrilobiteCannibal Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  New Deviant  Traditional Artist
Yeah, petty much :p
Reply
:iconthedubstepaddict:
TheDubstepAddict Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Lol
Reply
:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Carnotaurus definetly lived ONLY in the Late Cretaeceous, not both the Early Cretaceous and the Late Cretaceous, right?
Reply
:iconasuma17:
Asuma17 Featured By Owner Edited Feb 14, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I never the Early Cretaceous; Upper Cretaceous means somewhere in the stage of Cretaceous levels which is 90-80 million years at best, the Lower Cretaceous was 70-65 years unless you don't count the Early Cretaceous I'm only presenting the Late Cretaceous as the example and that's where both Carnotaurus and Talenkauen represent in.
Reply
:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
No, Lower Cretaceous is the SAME as Early Cretaceous.
Reply
:iconasuma17:
Asuma17 Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Are you really that confident that you could consider Early Cretaceous as the lower? There is such a thing as an upper part of that period and the Early was pretty much the upper part; unless you're concluding the stages of each chronological time placement in the Cretaceous period?
Reply
:iconbrolyeuphyfusion9500:
"Early was pretty much the upper part"

Um, I doubt that sediment deposition works that way. It's like when you put a fresh batch of asphalt on top of an old road, the fresh asphalt doesn't end up underneath the road.
Reply
:iconasuma17:
Asuma17 Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
It still sounds odd when putting the higher number period above the lower number.
Reply
:iconbrolyeuphyfusion9500:
It's not odd at all, really. Newer sediments somehow phasing through older sediments and settling below them is vastly odder.
Reply
:iconasuma17:
Asuma17 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Not really to me, it's the number arrangement at that point that is odd.
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
No, Upper Cretaceous is the FUCKING SAME as Late Cretaceous, while Lower Cretaceous is the same as Early Cretaceous. That's how it goes, man.
Reply
:iconasuma17:
Asuma17 Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
No that's not how it goes because there are lower and upper parts of the period or the stage that comes from the period. It's kinda of like the layers in an onion; cut one layer then you venture deeper down beneath. Trees work too dude, everything is upper to lower and so are time periods.
Reply
:iconbrolyeuphyfusion9500:
I think it's that way because Early Cretaceous strata are found beneath Late Cretaceous strata. So Early = Lower and Late = Upper because of the way strata are deposited. Younger sediments usually go on top of older rocks.
Reply
:iconasuma17:
Asuma17 Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
If your going by the numbers of the years? They consider more of Carnotaurus as a lower Cretaceous dinosaur (though this maybe referring more on the stage it came from).

It's sounds pretty odd considering they should the higher number on top than the lower number.
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Right. It missed the Early Cretaceous by ~30 Ma or so.
Reply
:iconthedubstepaddict:
TheDubstepAddict Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
He was a badass if he survived that long. I don't know an other dino surviving that long...
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Huh? I just meant it lived at a different time, not that it existed for that long.
Reply
:iconthedubstepaddict:
TheDubstepAddict Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
oh... my bad english is killing me...
Reply
:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks!
Reply
:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2015
Although we've found scales on the carnotaur skin, I feel we should not entirely rule out the possibility of fuzz. After all, large mammals tend to look hairless, but when examined up close have very fine hairs. So I wonder if large dinosaurs were the same way with protofeathers. As you can see I am very liberal about the reconstruction of dinosaurs :)
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I wouldn't rule this out, but developmentally hair growing through naked skin is not the same as feathers (or hair) growing up through diapsid scales, which are themselves dermal structures that need to have their development initiated by gene regulation. Not that it's impossible, but it's not a fair analogy to look at elephants and rhinos and conclude that dinosaurs could do it just as easily. Now the naked head of vultures or heads and necks of ostriches and their transition to feathers - THAT is basically the same as the elephant scenario, and perhaps naked unscaly skin was more common in non-avian dinosaurs than is commonly portrayed.
Reply
:iconmesozoic0906:
Mesozoic0906 Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2015
sora.unm.edu/sites/default/fil…

Surprisingly, there is a case where feathers come out between scales.
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
You also see it in some specialty breeds of chickens. And I've argued elsewhere that combining scales and feathers in non-avian dinosaurs might conceivably have been easier (if making them largely exclusive developmentally was an avian adaptation to reducing weight), but I'd still hesitate to start laying feathers on everywhere that we know there were scales from skin impressions.
Reply
:iconmesozoic0906:
Mesozoic0906 Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2015
I'm also catious, but might be a answer to many questions.

The first species that come into mind is Psitaccosaurus. Living in cool climate(Yixian), small size, but with extensive scale impression. Also a lot of hadrosaurs, ceratopsians, ankylosaurs, sauropods lived in cooler climate and didn't hatched out of a egg as multi-ton beast.

Darren Naish once mentioned there is a psittacosaurus with extensive covering of quills. might be this.
Reply
:icondjake:
Djake Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Have you ever considered posting your images at a larger size?  There have been a few cases (such as the maxilla-facial layout and forelimbs here, or the hip structure in some of your Apatosaurs) where I would love to get a closer look at the workings.
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
On my website I occasionally post them larger. At some point I'll probably do some sort of web booklet with higher resolution images, but I'm totally out of extra time these days. 
Reply
:icondjake:
Djake Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I know the feeling.
Size aside, I'm still a bit in awe of these images.  They're appreciated.
Reply
:iconfrostywaters:
FrostyWaters Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2014
:iconepicclapplz:
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Carnotaurus would have a hard time clapping like that ;)
Reply
:iconcindyaa:
CindyAA Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
is it on a museum, where Could I see it? *_* sorry, I'm ignorant for this subject, I just want to see those skins impressions you told
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
At one point I believe a cast of some of the impressions were on display at the LACM. Yet despite having just been there last year during SVP I can't recall offhand if that is still on display in the overhauled displays. Otherwise I presume the originals are housed (and possibly displayed) at the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales in Argentina. There's also a photo or two in the Czerkas 1997 paper in the Dinofest volume.
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Are there any estimates about how fast this guy was? I've heard lots of stuff but I have no idea what to believe...
Reply
:iconliamythesh:
Liamythesh Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I never knew it had such a long neck and tiny head. You always see it restored wrong I guess with a really big head.
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
I think some illustrations may be influenced by the villain in Disney's Dinosaur.
Reply
:iconliamythesh:
Liamythesh Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Probably.
Reply
:iconblazze92:
bLAZZE92 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2014
Do you know where can I find good photos of the skin impressions? I have Bonaparte et al. (1990) but I can't really make out what I'm seeing in figure 37 haha

btw Juares-Valieri et al. (2010) and Novas et al. (2013) suggested that the femur would have been shorter than the 103cm it was originally reconstructed, if it was indeed shorter, will that affect the legs of your skeletal?
Reply
:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner May 1, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Reply
:icondinobirdman:
DinoBirdMan Featured By Owner May 17, 2013  Student Artist
Carnotaurus are great common for my drawing!:)
Reply
:icongojira5000:
Gojira5000 Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Out of Albertosaurus, Daspletosaurus and a parity-sized Carnotaurus, who would win in an arm-wrestling contest? :P
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
One of the tyrannosaurs, because Carnotaurus couldn't really even flex its elbow or wrist through the necessary arcs.
Reply
:icondarcygagnon:
Darcygagnon Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Too bad, they didn't find any more specimens of Carnotaurus, just a single skeleton, with skin impression on it.
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Agreed - it's always frustrating when you can't get ahold of additional specimens (it also makes it impossible to even try to answer questions about whether there is gender-based variation, etc.).
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×




Details

Submitted on
March 13, 2012
Image Size
1.2 MB
Resolution
4170×1608
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
13,083 (5 today)
Favourites
191 (who?)
Comments
128
×