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January 25
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Europe's shield by ScottHartman Europe's shield by ScottHartman
Here is my reconstruction of Europelta. I actually worked on this in cahoots with the Jim Kirkland while they were working on the original description. For a deeper dive on Europelta and the hows and whys of reconstructing the armor you can check out my blog description here: www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/e…
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:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner May 1, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
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:iconthediremoose:
thediremoose Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2014
It looks like a polacanthid on the verge of becoming a nodosaurid.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
It does, although phylogenetically it seems to be the opposite - a nodosaurid retaining some polacanthid plesiomorphies.
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:iconlikosaurus:
Likosaurus Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2014  Professional Filmographer
Pretty nice. I assume this one is around ~1 ton? 
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
I haven't done a mass estimate on it, but I'd guess it would be in the 750-1000 kg range.
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:iconlikosaurus:
Likosaurus Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2014  Professional Filmographer
Awesome, at least I didn't go that far off. Can't wait for the mass estimates, guess I'll use that for the time being. Thanks yet again!
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:iconorionide5:
Orionide5 Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2014
I heard recently that ankylosaurs' forefeet splayed outward in a star shape; is that possible?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
An asymmetrical star-shape, yes. If you've seen good illustrations of sauropod hands, imagine that but a bit wider and with the hand still having fingers (making the points of the "star").
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:iconyapok96:
Yapok96 Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2014
I find it interesting how Stegosaurs and Sauropods seemed to lose their digitagrade-ness in favor of a more plantigrade foot (not technically plantigrade, but close--they remind me of elephant feet), but Ankylosaurs, which seem just as massively built, very much kept the digitigrade feet. Do you know anything about what circumstances would cause an animal evolve either a digitigrade or plantigrade foot?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
There are competing ideas on this, but one thing I will stake myself on is that losing the permanently flexed knee is a necessary (though not sufficient) condition in non-sprawling animals. I suspect that the straight-knee-plantigrade stance leads to the most efficient form of walking at the sacrifice of acceleration and power (some day I'll write up a blog post, or better yet submit a paper on why that is).

If that's correct, then the simple answer is that sauropods and elephants (and possibly stegosaurs...I'm not yet sure about them) lead lives that favored efficiency over locomotor performance, while ceratopsians, hadrosaurs, and ankylosaurs did not.
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