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Feathered spinosaur-mimic by ScottHartman Feathered spinosaur-mimic by ScottHartman
Austroraptor, the spinosaur-imitating basal dromaeosaur. I have to admit, I never thought I'd type those words together, but it goes to show that life really is stranger than fiction (fiction, after all, has to be believable).

This is another case where I couldn't in good conscience post the skeletal without the rigorous version. The actual completeness falls well below my threshold for not doing a skeletal, but it was commissioned for a museum display, so I've done what I can, pulling in data from Unenlagia and Buitreraptor to fill in the gaps. It's probably not crazy wrong, but for those of you who hate to have your artwork shown to be wrong by later discoveries: Draw at your own risk!
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:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner May 1, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
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:icondelirio88:
DELIRIO88 Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Scott did you hear about the publication made by Currie and Paulina Carabajal?
There are some new infos concerning the animal's arms, the hand and the foot!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, and I just reread it after seeing you bring it up, but it doesn't require any changes (although I could expand the rigorous version to cover "all known material" I suppose - it would look less pathetic).
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:icondelirio88:
DELIRIO88 Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Good to know. Time for an Austroraptor live restoration! :D
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Whoops, I was wrong - the forearms are even shorter it turns out. Guess I'll have to hop on that later today.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013
Where do you get the spinosaur-imitating descriptor from? I don't see anything spinosaurid in the bones or name.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
The reduction of features associated with hyper-carnivory in favor of fish-eating, include the elongated and thin snout, and the teeth that are reduced in size but increased in number. Also, the preserved cervicals suggest a neck that doesn't have as strong of an S-curve as in "normal" dromaeosaurs, which again seems similar to spinosaurids.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013
That makes sense. I guess my confusion arose from the overall skeleton more closely resembling suchomimus or baryonyx, rather than spinosaurus.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Ah, I meant "spinosaurid", not Spinosaurus.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013
Indeed, I understand that by now.
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:iconprimevalraptor:
PrimevalRaptor Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This here is based on your reconstruction: [link] Of course I gave credit.
Great skeletal, BTW.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Sorry I didn't see this before, but that's very cool, and thanks for the credit :D
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:iconprimevalraptor:
PrimevalRaptor Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, no problem. ^^
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:icondinosaurusbrazil:
dinosaurusbrazil Featured By Owner May 2, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I will say what I said for :iconhyrotrioskjan:
"they lived in a place that the ecological niche of spinosaurs was available, so they could evoluted with any natural competitors".
BTW, good job and I loved this drawing.
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:iconteratophoneus:
Teratophoneus Featured By Owner May 2, 2012
I based this [link] on your skeletal reconstruction. I also provided a link to your pic here.
I think I made the head too small....
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner May 2, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Good stuff. :)
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:iconteratophoneus:
Teratophoneus Featured By Owner May 3, 2012
thanksa lot. Always an honour to hear that from you :)
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:iconsketcherjak:
sketcherjak Featured By Owner May 2, 2012
astounding!
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:icon007access:
007access Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2012
dude i like your work but the dromaeosaurs killing claws look small and less dynamic
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
They seem to be reduced in other South American dromaeosaurs - and as a presumptive fisher (i.e. a really weird dromaeosaur) it most likely wasn't using them the way other dromaeosaurs did.

That said, they aren't known yet in Austroraptor, so if you wanted to give it Utahraptor-like foot long killing scythes I can't say you're definitely wrong, although I doubt it would be confirmed when more fossils are found.
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:iconrafael-albo:
Rafael-Albo Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I love this animal.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
I saw this animal presented at SVP years and years ago (not completely prepped out) in a presentation, and honestly at the time I thought they were mistaking an incomplete spinosaur for a giant dromaeosaur (at the time I believe they thought it was a giant troodontid). It's been fun to watch this bizarre animal make its way to publication.
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:iconrafael-albo:
Rafael-Albo Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
For me, its a spinosaurid.
it has all the characteristics
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:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2012
Nice.:) Though I didn't know the Austroraptor remains were THAT scrappy!:O
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
They're pretty pathetic.
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:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner May 3, 2012
BTW do you think spinosaurs had webbed feet since isotopic studies suggests that they are more aquatic than most other theropods))?:confused:
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:iconirkenarmada1:
Irkenarmada1 Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I don't think so. Web-footed animals tend to swim very frequently, and spinosaurs show no adaptions for swimming. Also, it's indicated that they mostly fed near the water and that their isotope counts reflected their dependence on watery areas.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner May 3, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
I'm not convinced that the isotope data really demonstrates that. Bone isotopes are impacted by the water you drink (which then gets incorporated into your bone tissue) not what you stand in. Sure, crocodiles and such that live in the water also drink it a lot, but what about an animal participating in a heron-like lifestyle?

The isotope data at this point is only clear on the fact that spinosaurs were drinking water from aquatic habitats...but you would expect them to if they are fishing there regularly. Whether that means they fished from the shore, waded into shallow water, or actually submerged themselves into a more aquatic lifestyle with frequent swimming is not something that the data can discriminate between.

That said, webbed feet is a cool idea - even waders or shoreline dwellers might benefit from it. There's no evidence either way right now, but it seems like a reasonable speculation.
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:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner May 7, 2012
BTW do you agree that spinosaurs may have behaved more like giant herons than bipedal crocodiles?[link] :confused::?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner May 7, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
At this point I prefer the heron model (I expect herons would also have the same isotope ratios...but that would be an excellent test for someone to conduct!). But I'm not totally against the croc hypothesis, I just don't think the evidence is there for it yet. Of course there's some differences between different spinosaur clades, so perhaps different lineages followed different strategies.
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:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner May 8, 2012
I see.:) BTW what do you think of this: [link] :confused::?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner May 8, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Methane emissions from vertebrate herbivores have always been a significant component of global methane emissions (well, ever since vertebrates became a significant part of the terrestrial ecosystem...), so in a way the paper seems self-evident.

I've skimmed their numbers and take no issue with it. It's always nice to see something like this quantified, it's just not really surprising to me.
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(1 Reply)
:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner May 4, 2012
Ok thanks!:)
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yep, this is a "I'd only draw a bust" dinosaur. Awesome work as always, Scott - I'm not surprised by the slope of the post-lacrimal part of the skull roof.
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:icondesmodeus:
Desmodeus Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Feel the need to point out that you have 'known' as 'knowb' in the second line.

I'm sort of amased you were asked for a reconstruction from so few bones. :S
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Your mind must be playing tricks on you...

:P
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:icondesmodeus:
Desmodeus Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hah, must be. :P
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2012  Student General Artist
Well, I'm going to draw it anyway, because I'm hardcore like that :p
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
That IS hardcore. I look forward to it.
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
so... is it a raptor or a spinosaurus? A spinoraptor?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
It's a dromaeosaur ("raptor"), but the head seems to converge with spinosaurs. Also, it's good size.
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
how big?
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:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2012
Around 5 meters (16 feet) long ;)
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Big!
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:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012
Yup, but not Utahraptor-sized ;)
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
It's more Nanotyrannus sized.
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:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012
Actually, there is a new Nanotyrannus which is larger than that: [link] ;)
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(1 Reply)
:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2012
Great! Ive been sketching an Austroraptor recently, seems like I underestimated a bit the head and forelimbs lenght...
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
So is it hypothesized that this dromaeosaur was a piscivore?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
That seems to be the consensus, although there isn't direct evidence (e.g. gut contents) like in spinosaurs.
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