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Gorgosaurus libratus by ScottHartman Gorgosaurus libratus by ScottHartman
Medium-sized tyrannosaur from the Campanian of North America, found in western Canada and the U.S.
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:iconpaleo-reptiles:
Paleo-reptiles Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2016
need to update
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
www.skeletaldrawing.com/therop…

My website always has the most up to date version. I try to keep up here, but DA is more for fun (and I don't have a discussion forum on my site).
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:icondovahkiinhu3br:
DovahkiinHU3BR Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2016
The skull of a gorgosaurus looks a lot like the skull of a nanotyrannus.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
There are definitely some similarities - It was originally described as a species of Gorgosaurus in the 1940s and Greg Paul tried to sink the type specimen of Nanotyrannus back into Gorgosaurus in the late 1980s. But of course earlier ontogenetic stages often (though not always) reflect ancestral conditions - this is a big theoretical problem for phylogeneticists as they 
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:icondovahkiinhu3br:
DovahkiinHU3BR Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2016
Sure, but the fact is that it has about 2/3 the size of a full grown gorgosaurus and is almost identical to it.
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:iconmegalosaurid:
Megalosaurid Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2013
Can you make an Adult Gorgosaurus??
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
I made one that is under NDA. At this point it will be some time before I can attempt another one though, sorry.
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:iconmegalosaurid:
Megalosaurid Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2013
No problem man, But It would be awesome to have a full grown Gorgosaurus, to study the evolutionary paths of Tyrannosaurs.
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:iconsapiens89:
sapiens89 Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
the tail of Gorgosaurus seems fine for an animal of 8-9 m, the latest findings show that the muscle of the tail of the dinos was quite large, what do you think? this applies to Gorgosaurus?
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:iconsapiens89:
sapiens89 Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
thanks.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
The new studies show that the base of the tail was quite heavy - and it definitely applied to Gorgosaurus. As for length, that differs between species.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2011
If you were to do a skeletal of an Albertosaur, would you make it look any different to the Gorgosaur?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
A bit, although outside of perhaps the head I doubt many people would notice. I should point out that this specimen is a subadult (think of it as a "teenager" gorgosaur) so an adult would be a bit more robust.
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:iconavp-deviant-thane:
AVP-DEVIANT-THANE Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2012
Hello again XD I was just wondering that if I were to do a sculpture of gorgosaurus, would it be accurate to have my sculpture (of a gorgosaurus) eating or attacking a corythosaurus. I am just wondering if the two would have met in real life or the corythosaurus went extinct before this event could of taken place since by what i have read, corythosaurus lived around 77-76.5 million years ago and gorogaurus between about 76.5 and 75 million years ago.
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
It looks like an Albertosaurus to me, but excellent reconstruction anyway!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2010  Professional Digital Artist
Well, there's still some debate about whether Gorgosaurus should be synonimized into Albertosaurus or not. At the moment most of the tyrannosaur workers support generic distinction based upon characters that don't show up very well in skeletal drawings, so as far as that goes you are correct, it DOES look like an Albertosaurus, and to at least a minority of workers it actually is.

Personally I'm ambivalent, as there really isn't such a thing as a "genericometer", so one paleontologists "two species in the same genus" is anothers "two different but closely related genera". They definitely are different species however.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2007  Professional Digital Artist
And done. Thanks!
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:iconguilmon182:
guilmon182 Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Awseome reconstruction, but you might wanna' edit the title. It says "GorGORsaurus".
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February 3, 2007
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