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Speedy Plunderer by ScottHartman Speedy Plunderer by ScottHartman
Velociraptor, the eponymous "raptor" of the Jurassic Park franchise. This is based on a virtually complete specimen held at the Wyoming Dinosaur Center. The suffix "raptor" is often translated as thief or robber, but "plunderer" strikes me as more accurate, since the term seems to have originally applied to outside invaders (think barbarians) and their activities when sacking a village (both to village, and to the villagers). As such the name probably should carry somewhat more sinister connotations than a small feathered theropod that wants to make off with your stereo.
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:icongrisador:
grisador Featured By Owner May 24, 2015
Kinda remins 'unic' scaly times before ''Featherfull/Furry reneissance :D ''
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:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner May 1, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
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:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Your skeletal reconstructions are essential sources of information for the work of the paleoartist. Besides that I like your titles:D (Big Grin) 
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:iconblade-of-the-moon:
Blade-of-the-Moon Featured By Owner Jun 12, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Hey Scott, do you have a quick list of the differences between this one and the 2006 version ?

Another note, I heard recently that the boney ring around the eye isn't really around it but it is part of the eyeball itself giving animals with them larger overall eyes..any truth to that ? We were discussing plesiosaurs though so it may have no bearing here.
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:iconjeda45:
Jeda45 Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014
It is part of the eyeball, specifically part of the sclera or "white" of the eye. Humans are one of the few animals with significant portions of the sclera visible; as such, the actually visible portion of the eye would be contained within the hole in the middle of the ring (technically a scleral or sclerotic ring). In fact, the size of the scleral ring is actually a fairly good osteological correlate for the size of the eye.
Also: I dare you to type the word "sclera" several times in the space of a few sentences and have it not lose all meaning.

Scott: There's a picture of an "undescribed velociraptor skull" on Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:VEL…. I did some digging in the literature (Hone et al. 2012 and the Hayashibara Museum of Natural Sciences Research Bulletin) and it seems to be the skull of MPC-D100/54. Am I right (or can you not say?)? So is that one of the specimens that filled in for missing bits from the WDC specimen?
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:iconblade-of-the-moon:
Blade-of-the-Moon Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Type it ? I say it twice and forget what I'm talking about.  lol

Thanks for the info ! Working on a 1:1 Triceratops now so it helps there !
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
This one is more accurate? Ok...aside from the repose, I've generally added a bit more soft-tissue along the tail and dorsal neural spines. I've somewhat altered the neck musculature in all my theropods (now they better match living ones in that the base of the neck has a bit more depth to it on the top). I've made limb tendons a bit thicker, and I'm also deepening the ventral side of the neck to match osteological correlates seen in extant birdsn (and posteriorly to better line up with the sternocleidomastoideus origination).
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:iconblade-of-the-moon:
Blade-of-the-Moon Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Okay thank you. It helps having the artist who did the changes point it out for me..let's me know what changes I need to make to my own sculpture here, I'm just starting to frame it up so it was great to find you did an updated version. Thanks again !
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:icontrixieryuu:
TrixieRyuu Featured By Owner May 7, 2013
Hell I remember my face when I realized that JP raptors refer to this little critter. (Not that I don't like the real one)
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:iconwynterhawke07:
Wynterhawke07 Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
The raptors were supposed to be Deinonychus, which the palaeontologists Michael Crichton and Steven Spielberg consulted considered to be a species of Velociraptor.
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:icontkwth:
TKWTH Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2015  Student Traditional Artist
Okay, upon further research, the best candidate for the real-life equivalent of the JP raptors seems to be Achillobator (which, as a long-time fan of Achillobator, I can only rejoice over).
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:iconwynterhawke07:
Wynterhawke07 Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
That seems to be the going assumption of the Jurassic Park wiki. 
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:icontkwth:
TKWTH Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
To be fair, they didn't turn out that much like Deinonychus either. Utahraptor was closer in size, but I don't recall there being any Dromaeosaurids with such an Allosaurine head...
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:iconwynterhawke07:
Wynterhawke07 Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
It's what people thought dromeosaurs looked like in the 80's and early 90's. 
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:icontrixieryuu:
TrixieRyuu Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2013
That's ture, but the movie didn't say a word about it, you know I was so little I didn't even know there's JP books out there.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2013
How long do you think a velociraptor egg was? I've been contemplating making a velociraptor nest for a long time, but have put very little effort into getting anything sorted out.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Half the volume of a lesser rhea egg?
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2013
I was hoping you could tell me in inches, like from tip-to-tip.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
I'd guess somewhere between 3.5 and 4 inches, and I'd presume they are shaped like troodontid eggs.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2013
Excellent. I suspected exactly both those details. Thanks.
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:icongojira5000:
Gojira5000 Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I was mucking about with this skeletal, removed the bones from it, and fleshed it out, and somehow, from a basic Velociraptor-like animal no less, I got a omnivorous dromaeosaurid the size of a African forest elephant that preys upon ankylosaurs:
[link]

Not sure if I should be worried about this or not, or if this speculative dromaeosaur could even function at that size. :P
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:icongojira5000:
Gojira5000 Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Before I forget, this is at the end of the description:

"Credit where credit is due; thanks :iconscotthartman:, for the skeletal this was based on."
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks, I appreciate it. :)
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:iconornitholestes1:
Ornitholestes1 Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, I was discussing the Jurassic Park novel with some friends when the mention of the novel's Velociraptor came up. One thing that was mentioned right away was the part about them having "heads two feet long" and, well, the inevitable happened. Click at your own risk. [link] So sorry for mutilating your excellent skeletal!
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:iconwynterhawke07:
Wynterhawke07 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
The novel makes it pretty clear the "raptors" are supposed to be Deinonychus, which according to the palaeontologist consulted was a species of Velociraptor. That said, the picture is hilarious.
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:iconornitholestes1:
Ornitholestes1 Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks, I'm aware of the fact about Chrichton calling them Velociraptor after GS-er, that person we don't mention when in proximity of Scott Hartman :)
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
That's pretty darned funny.
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Mar 12, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
This, along with your newer skeletals, will be very useful for my future drawings, thanks ;)
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:icondelirio88:
DELIRIO88 Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Nice! Waiting for Utahraptor edit! :)
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:icontheblazinggecko:
theblazinggecko Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
So when did the term "raptor" get coined to birds of prey?
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2013
I'm guessing long before dinosaurs were discovered.
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:iconmajass:
Majass Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013  Professional General Artist
Thanks for posting! :D Great reference skeletal. May I ask why many of the skeletals are using "walking" postures, instead of the "running" poses? Is there something significant to this or...? :)
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Um...that's a long explanation, but suffice it to say that this walking pose in the new standard I'm using (and it's free for others to adopt as well).
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:iconmajass:
Majass Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2013  Professional General Artist
Does it mean that the running pose is more incorrect? Or just that you prefer to look at them walking? XD
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
It means that Greg Paul would prefer it if people don't use the running pose he chose, while I'd rather use a pose that everyone feels free to adopt, so after discussing it on my blog I went with this pose.

It can be an advantage though, as some paleontologists think that some (or even all) gigantic theropods could not sprint like that, and while I don't always agree it is nice to have a pose that doesn't force someone to tacitly accept running when all they want to do is show off the anatomy.
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:iconmajass:
Majass Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2013  Professional General Artist
Good point! Thanks! :)
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:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
one does not simply plunder at slow velocities... :rofl:
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:iconthediremoose:
thediremoose Featured By Owner May 3, 2013
One does not simply WAIR into Mordor...
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:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner May 3, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
:D
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
That would seem incongruous.
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:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
*uses google translator* Thanks for a new word! :sqeee:
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
My DA pages are educational on multiple fronts ;)
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:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
indeed! :squee: :)
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:iconmaxterandkiwiking:
MaxterandKiwiKing Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hooray!!! A velociraptor skeletal!!!!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, I feel bad as I should have posted that here half a decade ago. Ah well, better late than never, right?
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:iconmaxterandkiwiking:
MaxterandKiwiKing Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yup.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013
I think the thief connotation is almost entirely based on the speed of the animal. He is quick, therefore making him a more effective thief. He doesn't linger to cause chaos. It's the exact same reason our modern falcons/hawks/eagles are called raptors.
On top of that, "raptor" is more etymologically connected to "robber" than "plunderer".
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Actually, if I recall my Osborn correctly, he thought both Veliciraptor and Oviraptor may have eaten eggs and young, so I believe he had something closer to the original definition in mind when he named it.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013
Quite likely; for Oviraptor (originally "Fenestrasaurus") it was associational; for Velociraptor (originally "Ovoraptor"), it may have been due to similar association. The type of the latter is not mentioned having been recovered in any particular way, and I do not have a copy of Osborn's original presentation to the AMNH in which his first proposed names were coined (but note, not formally; they've only been "published" as junior synonyms, and never as full nomina valida that any version of the ICZN would recognize. Even Osborn didn't use the names in any context afterward, though the names appeared on tags for the specimen!
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2013
"To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women"...raptor
Lamentoraptor? I like it!
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