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July 1, 2013
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Trombone-o-saurus by ScottHartman Trombone-o-saurus by ScottHartman
The flamboyant Parasaurolophus, as painted for Daily Interactive (hence the side-view with no background). I went against the urge to make the coloring as outrageous as the crest, and instead opted for a sable antelope sort of inspiration. The somewhat unusual skin folds were also my own riff on the folds often found in hadrosaur mummies. Not as fun as John Conway's All Yesterdays version [link] but better fitting with the needs of the client (and still quite a ways from my usual style).

If you look beneath all the folds and tissue, you may notice that this is a well fed as well as well-built individual, and it highlights the new expanded tail muscles that have been talked about so much of late [link] - this also reflects my own work on shoulder girdle and forearm musculature, as well as neck tissue depth.
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:iconjdailey1991:
Jdailey1991 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014
I like this more than Conway's version.  What I saw in All Yesterdays was my favorite dinosaur turned into an unappealing fatso.  Speaking of fat, have you added some fat in this, too?  Or is this just skin-wrapped?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
It definitely is reconstructed with some fat deposits, but still as a fairly healthy and svelte individual. John's version was presented to be authoritative so much as to get people to remember the limits of what we know about dinosaurs, and it may well be that some (most likely herbivores) carried a lot of extra weight. 
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:iconjdailey1991:
Jdailey1991 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014
What do you mean by "authoritative"?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
I mean John wasn't so much implying that Parasaurolophus was definitely a porker, but rather picked a plausible taxa to demonstrate the idea.
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:icondewlap:
dewlap Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2013
Do we have any hadrosaurian specimens that shows "hooves" on any of the fingers? Should the whole hand be encased in a "mittenlike" covering (except for the fifth digit, of course) with no hooves showing? I'm just curious to know because every time I look at any hadrosaurian manus prints; it seems none of them have any hoof impressions on them (even elephants' prints do have them from time to time). However, people always refer me to this page ([link] to say that they do have hooves on their fingers. What do you think?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
The Dave Hone post you link to just shows that the shape of the terminal ungal on the hand is correct for walking on (which it is), it doesn't make the claim that it had to be encased in a true keratinous hoof like other quadrupeds. The "mummy" hand at the Tyrell (which I've seen, but not for several years now) really does make it look like the whole foot is encased in the "mitten" without visible external hooves.

Which I admit seems weird, but that's all the evidence we have right now (along with the trackways, as you mention).
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:icondewlap:
dewlap Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2013
Thanks for the reply. I also think the no external hoof interpretation does make more sense to the available evidence. Thanks again for the clarification.
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:iconpaleo-reptiles:
Paleo-reptiles Featured By Owner Jul 3, 2013
my dear Scott! Congratulation for your birthday anniversary !
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:icontheropod1:
theropod1 Featured By Owner Jul 3, 2013
What do you think, regardless of the skin impressions, is it possible Hadrosaurs such as this one had some elephant-like filaments that were not preserved?
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Jul 2, 2013
Beautiful. There are skin impressions of Parasaurolophus frill? I thought it was more likely that it had a smooth skin frill like other lambeosaurines rather than a serrated one.
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