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Uteodon aphanoecotos by ScottHartman Uteodon aphanoecotos by ScottHartman
"Yewt-tooth" just didn't seem like an appropriate title here, so I went with the formal name instead. This smallish herbivore seems to be following the swiss-army-knife strategy of being capable of moving about on its hind limbs, but better at walking on all fours than it's larger cousin Camptosaurus would have been.

To be honest it looks somewhat inelegant with the back hunched over like that, but after probably a dozen attempts to "find" places to straighten the vertebral column (which is very well preserved I might add) I gave up and accepted that it's just not the most svelte of ornithischians.
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:iconjeda45:
Jeda45 Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014
Really is a "bent reptile", isn't it? I can only hope its more famous cousin would have been as well.
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:iconmaxterandkiwiking:
MaxterandKiwiKing Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Why do ornithopods always have a bony spike over their eyes? What is that thing?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
That spike is the palpebral, and it supported a tendon that in life would have created a sort of "sun-visor" contour. Some have suggested it would have made ornithopods look angry or fierce all the time.
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:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner May 1, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Must draw a life restoration of this guy... How big he was?
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:iconlikosaurus:
Likosaurus Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2014  Professional Filmographer
(Quite late reply) according to the skeletal itself it is like 3.25 metres long. At that length I believe it would be something around 500kg.
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks!
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:iconlikosaurus:
Likosaurus Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2014  Professional Filmographer
Welcome!
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2013
What's a "Yewt"? 
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
I'm honestly unsure whether you are quoting My Cousin Vinny (which is awesome) or seeking clarification on the indigenous peoples of Utah.
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:icondino-mario:
Dino-Mario Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
What an interesting ornithopod...Good skeletal as always Scott...
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks :)
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wow. Though the hunchback effect seems to be related to the articulation of the cervicals.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Yes and no - if the back were a bit more straight then the cervicals would in all probability not have need of that curvature.
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Interesting, because I wouldn't have expected this considering ornithopods with an even stronger downward bend of their anterior caudals. It's the comparatively short neck/short individual cervicals then?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Yes, I believe so.
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:iconthediremoose:
thediremoose Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
While on the subject of poorly-known "Camptosaurus" species, I've recently been wondering is Osmakasaurus depressus and Dakotadon lakotaensis (from the same formation) might be the same thing.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Entirely possible. More and better specimens would help (man, if I only had a nickel for every time I typed THAT sentence).
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
Do you think a terrestrial biped as big as Godzilla would be possible if its bones were filled with helium? Is helium toxic?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, what Broly said. It's just not gonna happen, no matter how awesome.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
The bones are one thing, the total amount of flesh and skin is another.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
How about helium-filled bones, and helium sacks throughout the soft tissue? What if there were micro helium-sacks in the bloodstream as well?
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:iconcoherentsheaf:
coherentsheaf Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013  Hobbyist
Even by using extreme measures you won't get more than 50% of the animal to consist of He, probably much less- therefore it would still collapse. As for your question about toxicity: Helium does not bid to other elements at all it is therefore not toxic.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013
I'm not saying Godzilla should float in the air. I'm saying the helium should help him stand upright.
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:iconcoherentsheaf:
coherentsheaf Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013  Hobbyist
I understand. The lift generated by it would be marginal though.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013
You're not helping Godzilla come to life, got dangit!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Just go watch Pacific Rim and forget about the physics IMO.
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(1 Reply)
:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2013
That's because you can't.

[link]

To get Godzilla to weigh as much as Spinosaurus at least, the amount of helium sacs needed would be enormous. There would be little room for organs, musculature, and others.
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:iconshinreddear:
ShinRedDear Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
I wasn't aware of the existence of this taxon. Indeed a strange beast. I really like it tough and I'd really like to do a life reconstruction of it. :)
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Your course lies clear then.
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:iconshinreddear:
ShinRedDear Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
Indeed ! Thanks ! :)
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:iconpivotshadow:
PivotShadow Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
It's name means "yewt-tooth"? What the heck is a yewt? Either there's a typo in the description or there's some object called a 'yewt' which happens to be shaped like iguanodontid teeth.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
"Yewt" refers to a group of native Americans that lived in Utah (one imagines they may be the group that gave the name to the state of Yewt-ah). The use of "-odon" was apparently due to the popularity of the suffix among basal iquanodonts, not because of any similarity between the teeth of the dinosaur and the people.
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:iconpivotshadow:
PivotShadow Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
Ah, ok. That explains it :P
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:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
maybe it's not elegant, but at least it looks suitable for placing a saddle on its back! :D
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:iconjeholbird:
Jeholbird Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
In that case... why not Giganotosaurus??! ;)
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:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Because we are dinofood. One does not simply put a saddle on a giganotosaurus. XD you can't make a steed out of a big honking dangerous predator, you need something you can defend a higher ground against. ;P just big enough to carry you and a few of your belongings. :B
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:iconjeholbird:
Jeholbird Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Meh. Jedi-jesus and Santa-drunk were caught riding a Whatthefuckisthatsaurus wrecks [link] (and so did Darwin [link] ), why can't we??!!
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:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
well, on a second thought, this dino would probably be big enough for children, but not an adult person XD
and... well... if you could find a way how to avoid predation... XD
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:iconjeholbird:
Jeholbird Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Life finds a way... :iconianmalcolmplz:
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:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
:rofl:
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:icongreen-mamba:
Green-Mamba Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
The fourth finger is shorter than I would have thought.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Me too. What can you do?
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:icongreen-mamba:
Green-Mamba Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013
Shrug your shoulders, move on.
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:icondinobirdman:
DinoBirdMan Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Student Artist
It looks good, but I doubt that Gregory Paul's skeletal drawing of Camptosaurus/Uteodon aphanoecetes from The Princeton Field Guide To Dinosaurs, which is to be immature with include 2 tonnes.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Certainly the type specimen was no where near 2 tonnes. I haven't seen the other specimens he is referring to, so I can't really comment either way on that.
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:icondinobirdman:
DinoBirdMan Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Student Artist
Okay, that's make since.:hmm:
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