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Walker's heavy claw (2016) by ScottHartman Walker's heavy claw (2016) by ScottHartman
2016 Update: I updated the presacral series to reflect the new identifications of Evers et al. 2015 in their Sigilmassasaurus description. This has the effect of putting a stronger S-curve back into the neck, but it still leaves us with a hangdog angle for the skull. Interestingly, the neural spine morphology suggests the building up of axial muscles or nuchal ligaments (or both) along the back of the neck and front of the dorsal column, which is not unlike what Andre Cau has suggested for Spinosaurus, and would make it analogous to what we see in Deinocheirus as well (but on a smaller scale than either of those taxa).

I'm not seeing the extreme upturn in the neck that Cau has hypothesized for Spinosaurus, but there is decent flexibility in the base of the neck, and of course Spinosaurus is more specialized in other areas and might be in the base of the neck as well - though I'd tend towards being more conservative right now since we don't lack for extreme speculation regarding Spinosaurus these days.


2015 Updated: After nearly a decade and a half here is the overhauled skeletal. The overall proportions aren't all that different, but some of the details are. The midline crest has been moved back above the lacrimal, and I can now confirm that the odd downcurving neck seems to be a real thing, although it also uses some upwardly deflected almost cervicalized anterior dorsals to achieve it. The gray portion of the ilium is the part that was preserved as an imprint (i.e. there is no surviving bone from those parts) and so its accuracy depends entirely on the observations of the original excavators.

Original description: Baryonyx wasn't the first spinosaurid found, but it went a long ways in clarifying what these sorts of theropods looked like and ate. And it turns out they ate fish - although like modern crocodilians, Baryonyx almost certainly ate anything else it could get a hold of too (both fish scales and iguanodont bones were found in its stomach).
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:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner 2 days ago  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Why does your website's Baryonyx have a rigorous skeletal with it?
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:iconpurple-hermit:
purple-hermit Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Lovely... one of my favourite dinosaurs
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:iconhaxex2:
HaxEX2 Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016  Student General Artist
I thought its thumb claw curved downwards like a hook. I must be quite outdated. Mind informing me?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
No, you're right. It's just curving away from you in the skeletal drawing.
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:iconhaxex2:
HaxEX2 Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016  Student General Artist
Huh. It just looks like a slightly bent claw to me. I guess that hook shape in the claw is more visible from a frontal view. Thanks.
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:iconmalcolmraptor:
Malcolmraptor Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
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:iconeclecticmanta:
EclecticManta Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016  Student Digital Artist
Another very interesting specimen! Also I love the idea of a timeline like the person that commented on this!!!
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:icontriggamafia:
triggamafia Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hmmmm... Any plan of making a timeline of skeletals? Where you display how your skeletals for certain animals has changed throughout the years? I'd be interested to see the progress and change in your understanding of these animals.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
I hadn't planned to do this, because people often don't check to see what is the updated version and so I didn't want to make the old ones visible to image searches...but maybe if they were all in the same image that wouldn't be a problem. It's an interesting idea!
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:icontriggamafia:
triggamafia Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah, all of them in the same image was what I was thinking. I'd definitely be interested in witnessing the progress you've made.
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:iconcrizz24:
Crizz24 Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2016  New Deviant
"Un día el T-rex no va a ser un T-rex"
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:iconpyroraptor42:
Pyroraptor42 Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2016
Sigilmassaurus?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Are you asking what Sigilmassasaurus is? It's a spinosaurine from Morocco...and recently it's been suggested that the taxa of Ibrahim et al's new specimen (they tried to dump all of the specimens into Spinosaurus, but recent papers suggest otherwise). In the paper Evers et al., re-examined the vertebral assignments from the Baryonyx monograph and made convincing arguments to change them, so I went back and updated the vertebral column once again.
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2016
Oooh!
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:iconarchanubis:
Archanubis Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2016
Trying to remember if the skull was that thin in the last update... I can't recall...

Also, do you have plans to update your Spinosaurus in the near future?  I know you had some issues with the Ibrahim et. all reconstruction, but I wonder if any new information came out.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Edited Jan 25, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
The skull is the same as the 2015 update. I may try to tackle Spinosaurus before summer, we'll see...
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:iconsteveoc86:
Steveoc86 Featured By Owner Edited Jan 27, 2016
.....aaaanndd Suchomimus?  It would be cool if at somepoint you could takle other spinosaur material like Sigilmassasaurus and Ichthyovenator even if they are mostly silhouette, it would be nice for a comparison image.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Tragically Suchomimus still isn't described well enough. I toyed with the idea of restoring it after Baryonyx since they are otherwise so similar, but Evers et al noted some differences in the cervical series, so I'm hesitant to make assumptions about the rest of the animal. I would like to do Ichthyovenator, and I will almost certainly have to explore Sigilmassasaurus when I redo Spinosaurus at some point.
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:iconarchanubis:
Archanubis Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016
How much do you know about Sigilmassasaurus and how it relates to other spinosaurs?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
About as much as anyone else who read the Evers et al (2015) paper and the more recent Hendrickx et al., paper on spinosaurine quadrates from Morocco. Why, what did you want to know?
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:iconarchanubis:
Archanubis Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016
Just curious, really.
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:iconcjcroen:
CJCroen Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Another Baryonyx update! Neat!
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:iconmalcolmraptor:
Malcolmraptor Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Does the odd downcurving neck hold up after Evers et al.'s interpretation of the cervical vertebrae series as C2-C6, C9 and C10 instead of C2, C3, C5, C6, C8, D1 and D2?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
To follow up on my previous answer, now that I've actually updated the skeletal it turns out that the downcurve is still present, but since the base of the neck now curves up more we get a slightly-odd looking S-curve rather than just a downcurve.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I will have to check to make sure, but from their own diagram it looks like it (note that they rotated the cervicals in their diagram, but the actual curve itself isn't too different).
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Edited Mar 14, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well...the baryonychine spinosaurs like this guy and Suchomimus are known from decent remains while Spinosaurus and his fellow spinosaurines were not (OTHER THAN our friend Spinosaurus who caused this ruckus)...I mean Irritator is known from just a skull and Oxalaia is known from very little too so perhaps we could reconstruct them with similar proportions? Or perhaps barys were more moving towards wading and doggy paddling and spinys were more akin to proper swimming and ducky paddling? That might explain the weirdly short legs of the spinys and the almost normal legs of the barys although I'm be careful of anything until the paper comes out at last...
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Anything like this could be true, but even whether or not Spinosaurus has those proportions is not at all certain, so the question here was whether or not Baryonyx could provide any corroborating evidence, and it cannot. 
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Right...I don't think we should jump to anything until we see that paper..is there any news on that new Utahraptor find at least? 
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:iconsilverdragon234:
SilverDragon234 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2015
The Baryonyx looks robust and vicious. A beautiful animal, even in death. If anyone gets bit by this brute, they're doomed - The heads of spinosaurs, abelisaurs and tyrannosaurs can prevent any escape.
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2016
Nice thinking.
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:iconsilverdragon234:
SilverDragon234 Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2016
:D Nobody can outfox me.
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016
Yup.
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:iconsilverdragon234:
SilverDragon234 Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016
:D
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:iconelsqiubbonator:
ElSqiubbonator Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2015
An interesting question--how come Baryonyx was proportioned so much more like a "normal" theropod than Spinosaurus was? Its forelimbs were much shorter than its hind limbs, for example.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
That's a very interesting question, but maybe not in the way you mean it. The REAL question is whether Spinosaurus really has those proportions.
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2016
Yeah.
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:iconskull12322:
skull12322 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
yeah ikr
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:iconprinzeburnzo:
PrinzeBurnzo Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
One of my favourite Dinosaurs! This looks great! :D
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:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner Edited Jan 21, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
pedrosalas.deviantart.com/art/…

And this is how it looked like in the flesh...more or less :) (Smile) 
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:iconarblos:
arblos Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
Cau posted something interesting on his site. The weird proportions could be due to misplaced vertebrae. Indeed, I always thought the body of their reconstruction looked overly long and until now I thought it was due to the tucked-in gastralia. 

theropoda.blogspot.com/2015/01…
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, I saw that. I have completely different data that comes to a similar conclusion. It looks like my blog post is slipping to next weekend, but hopefully not.
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:iconarchanubis:
Archanubis Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
Still one of my favorite dinosaurs.
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:iconarblos:
arblos Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
Agreed. Also my favorite Spinosaur.
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:iconmesozoic0906:
Mesozoic0906 Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015
What's your opinion on the likelyhood that Baryonyx had weird modified feet of new spinosaurus?
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
Long legged theropods don't usually have full webbed feet, even those who live in swampy habitats. Paddling is much more effective when you have short stumpy legs. However, not even Baryonyx had it's legs proportioned like a stork... so who knows.

Remember that there is no actual proof of Spinosaurus having webbed feet either.
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:iconelsqiubbonator:
ElSqiubbonator Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2015
Actually, plenty of long-legged wading birds have webbed feet. Flamingos, for example.
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:iconmesozoic0906:
Mesozoic0906 Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
I wasn't referring to "webbed" feet, which seems like just-a-story to me.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Wouldn't be crazy. Although I'm not sure how weird Spinosaurus's feet really are.
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:icontopgon:
TopGon Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I suppose that you know the icnites of Costalomo quarry in Sapin. There you have few threedimensional ones given to a large barioniquid. In those icnites there are not any webbing sign. What do you think?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I'm aware of the footprints (they are pretty incredible) but I'm not aware of any reason to assign them to spinosaurids instead of other large theropods. Has that been published somewhere?
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