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Walker's heavy claw by ScottHartman Walker's heavy claw by ScottHartman
Updated: After nearly a decade and a half here is the overhauled skeletal. The overall proportions aren't all that different, but some of the details are. The midline crest has been moved back above the lacrimal, and I can now confirm that the odd downcurving neck seems to be a real thing, although it also uses some upwardly deflected almost cervicalized anterior dorsals to achieve it. The gray portion of the ilium is the part that was preserved as an imprint (i.e. there is no surviving bone from those parts) and so its accuracy depends entirely on the observations of the original excavators.

I hope to have more on my blog this weekend. 

Previous description: Baryonyx wasn't the first spinosaurid found, but it went a long ways in clarifying what these sorts of theropods looked like and ate. And it turns out they ate fish - although like modern crocodilians, Baryonyx almost certainly ate anything else it could get a hold of too (both fish scales and iguanodont bones were found in its stomach).
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Edited Mar 14, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well...the baryonychine spinosaurs like this guy and Suchomimus are known from decent remains while Spinosaurus and his fellow spinosaurines were not (OTHER THAN our friend Spinosaurus who caused this ruckus)...I mean Irritator is known from just a skull and Oxalaia is known from very little too so perhaps we could reconstruct them with similar proportions? Or perhaps barys were more moving towards wading and doggy paddling and spinys were more akin to proper swimming and ducky paddling? That might explain the weirdly short legs of the spinys and the almost normal legs of the barys although I'm be careful of anything until the paper comes out at last...
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Anything like this could be true, but even whether or not Spinosaurus has those proportions is not at all certain, so the question here was whether or not Baryonyx could provide any corroborating evidence, and it cannot. 
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Right...I don't think we should jump to anything until we see that paper..is there any news on that new Utahraptor find at least? 
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:iconsilverdragon234:
SilverDragon234 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2015
The Baryonyx looks robust and vicious. A beautiful animal, even in death. If anyone gets bit by this brute, they're doomed - The heads of spinosaurs, abelisaurs and tyrannosaurs can prevent any escape.
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:iconelsqiubbonator:
ElSqiubbonator Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2015
An interesting question--how come Baryonyx was proportioned so much more like a "normal" theropod than Spinosaurus was? Its forelimbs were much shorter than its hind limbs, for example.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
That's a very interesting question, but maybe not in the way you mean it. The REAL question is whether Spinosaurus really has those proportions.
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:iconskull12322:
skull12322 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015
yeah ikr
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:iconprinzeburnzo:
PrinzeBurnzo Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
One of my favourite Dinosaurs! This looks great! :D
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:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner Edited Jan 21, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
pedrosalas.deviantart.com/art/…

And this is how it looked like in the flesh...more or less :) (Smile) 
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
Cau posted something interesting on his site. The weird proportions could be due to misplaced vertebrae. Indeed, I always thought the body of their reconstruction looked overly long and until now I thought it was due to the tucked-in gastralia. 

theropoda.blogspot.com/2015/01…
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, I saw that. I have completely different data that comes to a similar conclusion. It looks like my blog post is slipping to next weekend, but hopefully not.
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:iconarchanubis:
Archanubis Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
Still one of my favorite dinosaurs.
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
Agreed. Also my favorite Spinosaur.
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:iconmesozoic0906:
Mesozoic0906 Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015
What's your opinion on the likelyhood that Baryonyx had weird modified feet of new spinosaurus?
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
Long legged theropods don't usually have full webbed feet, even those who live in swampy habitats. Paddling is much more effective when you have short stumpy legs. However, not even Baryonyx had it's legs proportioned like a stork... so who knows.

Remember that there is no actual proof of Spinosaurus having webbed feet either.
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:iconelsqiubbonator:
ElSqiubbonator Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2015
Actually, plenty of long-legged wading birds have webbed feet. Flamingos, for example.
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:iconmesozoic0906:
Mesozoic0906 Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
I wasn't referring to "webbed" feet, which seems like just-a-story to me.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Wouldn't be crazy. Although I'm not sure how weird Spinosaurus's feet really are.
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:icontopgon:
TopGon Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I suppose that you know the icnites of Costalomo quarry in Sapin. There you have few threedimensional ones given to a large barioniquid. In those icnites there are not any webbing sign. What do you think?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I'm aware of the footprints (they are pretty incredible) but I'm not aware of any reason to assign them to spinosaurids instead of other large theropods. Has that been published somewhere?
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:icontopgon:
TopGon Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Well I only found this note saladeprensa.usal.es/webusal/f…

In there has no discussion about the dinosaur that rpoduced the track, but in the museum itself, they give it to an spinosaurid or an allosaurid based on the direct fossil register in the zone.
I think we can take the size of the claws as reference and compare them to Allosaurus ones in order to discard it.

If you visit the quarry, the guides don't hesitate to say that those are spinosaurid footprints.

Any idea?
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2015
I thought that trackway did show webbing?
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
Doesn't Deinocheirus have similar flat feet? Headden claimed that the flat feet were an adaptation for walking on soft terrain, not a paddle. 
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Huh? Deinocheirus only has three toes (ornithomimids actually lose the hallux). The claws are sort of flat and spatulate in both, so perhaps that's where the similarity comes in? I agree that they (and webbing) work just as well for walking on soft substrates as they do for swimming. 
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015
Yes, that's what I was talking about. The feet of Deinocheirus are also wide (presumably to help a large, heavy animal support it's weight on soft terrain).
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Beautiful revision. It looks just "right" now.
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:iconmalevouvenator:
malevouvenator Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015
So the neural spines are taller now. One question Scott: Do you think Spinosaurus is a strange hybrid or the scientist need to study more the remains?

P.D.: BTW: Has escrito naturalmente español? No sabia que hablaras español!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I think there are still scaling issues in Spinosaurus, and it _might_ have more than one taxa mixed in. 

Puedo leer español conversacional , pero estoy fuera de práctica por lo que hago trampa y usar Google Translate para responder a las preguntas.
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015
"..more than one taxa mixed in."

Namely, Sigilmassasaurus? I think we could end up having two gigantic spinosaurids living in the same time and place, one being more cursorial and the other primarily aquatic. In a biotope that is already dominated by large theropods. Cau said some interesting stuff in his blog but I might be jumping to conclusions too soon.

Anyway...I love how Suchomimus like the new Bary is!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Yes, Sigilmassasaurus is the presumptive culprit.
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015
I bet "Spinosaurus B" is that other taxa, not Sigilmassasaurus. They provided NO evidence for a "Spinosaurus B"/Spinosaurus synonymy other than similarity of the "neotype" and "Spinosaurus B" and that is debatable. Elsewhere, others have pointed out differences between "Spinosaurus B" and the "neotype".

Remember kids. Say no to taxa overlumping. Even Greg Paul accused Ibrahim et al. of overlumping.
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:icongardow:
Gardow Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The posture reminds me a lot of the mount I saw in London a while ago. A great first skeletal (update) for 2015! :)
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:iconjonagold2000:
JonaGold2000 Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Awsome, the head and neck look very different. Mostly due to the new neck position though. Great job. :) :)
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:iconmalcolmraptor:
Malcolmraptor Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Scott, do you plan to update your Suchomimus reconstruction as well?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I do, but it could be a little bit.
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:iconjavifel:
javifel Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015
¿Entonces las representaciones de Greg Paul eran correctas?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
En la posición de la cresta nasal, y en menor grado de la curvatura del cuello que es. En otras formas no tanto.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015
So, Scott, seems you've lengthened the skull quite a bit. Was fairly certain the lower jaw constrained a shorter skull.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Actually the skull is exactly the same length as before. But with the moving back of the nasal crest to above the lacrimal it's much lower and so it looks longer. 
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:icondiloporaptor:
Diloporaptor Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Mind if i asked what changed?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
The short version is that I trusted the fossils more. Aside from what I noted in the description, the vertebral column now has taller neural spines over the hips and front of the tail, the pelvis is larger, and the scapula isn't as long. 
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:icondiloporaptor:
Diloporaptor Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Alright, i was just Curious. Thanks!

also: dilophoraptor.tumblr.com/post/…
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Ha, awesome.
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:icondiloporaptor:
Diloporaptor Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Whats more awesome is that you're Following me, Thanks Scott!
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:iconshinreddear:
ShinRedDear Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015
You know the strangest thing about your new reconstruction ? The proportions make Baryonyx look like some early
illustrations from the late 90's ! Like a kind of retro-action. I may be wrong but early Baryonyx drawings made it look like this slender, very gracile critter with an almost snake-like silhouette. Anyway, very happy to see this famous british fisher to be revamped. A new look to an old friend. ;) Thank you for this hard work ! :D
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I think it's the neck posture as much as anything (and that's something the original description included). Thanks!
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:iconshinreddear:
ShinRedDear Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2015
Indeed, the neck is quite the defining characteristic ! Reminds me of the mount
in the National British Museum. And most welcome. ^^
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:iconroflo-felorez:
RoFlo-Felorez Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2015  Student Digital Artist
so is it official that Baryonyx and some other spinosaurs were bipedal? i mean with the new evidence of Spinosaurus with dinky legs would it also be possible that other spinosaurs shared the same structure too? or do we have actual skeletal proof that Baryonyx and others had much larger legs and whatnot? cus i've seen skeletons of a bipedal Spinosaurus and we know now that they weren't accurate so now its making us question others as well
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I don't think the new Spinosaurus reconstruction is accurate, but yes, Baryonyx and Suchomimus are clearly bipedal.
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:iconroflo-felorez:
RoFlo-Felorez Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2015  Student Digital Artist
ok so then its a matter of trying to understand the transition from bipedal to possibly semi-aquatic lifestyle, no?
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